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View Full Version : Sleep Apnea - What you don't know can kill you.


ed_in_az
25th August 2008, 05:50
Do you wake often at night, on your back, exhausted, with a dry mouth? Does your spouse/significant other say you snore?
Are you exhausted during the day?

One day you might not wake up.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sleep_apnea

http://www.medicinenet.com/sleep_apnea/article.htm

"it is estimated that only 10% of people with obstructive sleep apnea are being treated."

Until a few weeks ago I didn't know I had it. Now I recognize I've had it for decades. My wife says I've always snored, but about 6 weeks ago my wife got scared and woke me up. She said I sounded like I was choking to death. I probably was. A week later I woke myself up choking. I went to my doctor and he sent me for a "Sleep Study". Now I'm waiting on Insurance approval for a CPAP breathing machine.

Check out the articles and if you or someone you love have similar breathing difficulties get checked out. The life you save may be your own.

jim&pamsbike
25th August 2008, 11:41
I discovered I had severe sleep apnea a little over two years ago, and have been on cpap treatment ever since. The cpap will change your life, you'll be amazed how much better you feel and how much more energy you have. Of course there will be an adjustment period, it will take you a little while to get used to the machine but once you do life will be great. If you have any questions you can send me a PM.

Jim

xena
25th August 2008, 11:52
My cardiologist wants me to go in for the sleep study. I haven't scheduled it yet because of problems with my insurance. Will be interesting to see how many people post to this thread. Glad to hear you are on the path to feeling better Ed!

Jackster
25th August 2008, 12:35
I'm sorry you have that shit man, but damn did that sound read like a commercial. :D

roadogette
25th August 2008, 12:40
I don't have it, but my BF does. If he doesn't have his machine I can't sleep. He has one at my house. It will be going to Milwaukee with him.

grindbastard
25th August 2008, 12:57
I'm going to mention this to my wife...she has said that she's worried about me before because she "swore that I stopped breathing". And I generally feel like shit after I sleep.

linkin5
25th August 2008, 13:23
Sleep apnea is pauses in your breathing while asleep, you always will start breathing again but it may be in the from of gasping as you wake from it. It causes cardiovascular problems in the long run and that is the part that will kill you if left untreated. You won't die in your sleep from forgetting to breathe.

milmat1
25th August 2008, 14:14
Do you wake often at night, on your back, exhausted, with a dry mouth? Does your spouse/significant other say you snore?
Are you exhausted during the day?

One day you might not wake up.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sleep_apnea

http://www.medicinenet.com/sleep_apnea/article.htm

"it is estimated that only 10% of people with obstructive sleep apnea are being treated."

Until a few weeks ago I didn't know I had it. Now I recognize I've had it for decades. My wife says I've always snored, but about 6 weeks ago my wife got scared and woke me up. She said I sounded like I was choking to death. I probably was. A week later I woke myself up choking. I went to my doctor and he sent me for a "Sleep Study". Now I'm waiting on Insurance approval for a CPAP breathing machine.

Check out the articles and if you or someone you love have similar breathing difficulties get checked out. The life you save may be your own.

Are you overwieght, Dr told me that being overweight (like myself) Makes you more likely to develope Sleeo Apnea !
I snor so loudy that my wife often goes and sleeps in the spare bedroom in the middle of the night....

The sleep study sucks, They hook all kinds of stuff up to your body/head, and a breathing mask. Then tell you OK Go To Sleep !! LOL....

Good luck this can be dangerous !!

ed_in_az
25th August 2008, 15:29
Sleep apnea is pauses in your breathing while asleep, you always will start breathing again but it may be in the from of gasping as you wake from it. It causes cardiovascular problems in the long run and that is the part that will kill you if left untreated. You won't die in your sleep from forgetting to breathe.

I'm on pain meds to sleep because of my back and shoulder. That's a different problem (and thread) I'm still working on to get to a Neurologist. A friend told me to just take more pills to get to sleep. I won't do it. This got me to thinking about people taking drugs for pain and maybe because they too can't sleep. I know of two that died in their sleep. Then there's Heath Ledger. Could these have had undiagnosed sleep apnea? They all were reported as "accidental overdoses". I have a hard time concentrating, remembering, staying awake due to lack of sleep. It's gotten worse with my recent pain problems. Did these other folks forget what pills they had already taken, and when? Did they just wake up during the night and take another dose 'cause they wanted to get back to sleep? Then they were so drugged that they're next sleep apnea episode didn't wake them up and they choked to death. I'm pretty sure the autopsy would come out the same.

ed_in_az
25th August 2008, 15:37
Are you overwieght, Dr told me that being overweight (like myself) Makes you more likely to develope Sleeo Apnea !
I snor so loudy that my wife often goes and sleeps in the spare bedroom in the middle of the night....

The sleep study sucks, They hook all kinds of stuff up to your body/head, and a breathing mask. Then tell you OK Go To Sleep !! LOL....

Good luck this can be dangerous !!

I'm just average weight, but being overweight does make it more likely.

The study is definatley not fun. But quality of life is important. In the last few months as this has gotten worse for me I've quit riding my bike to work every day because I didn't feel safe anymore. I'm just not getting enough rest. As I suspected, and these posts have confirmed, I'm not alone in this condition on the forum. You guys and gals need to take care of yourselves.

bud095
25th August 2008, 16:21
ive had it for years but the cpap works really well....bud095

jim&pamsbike
25th August 2008, 16:49
I was 350 lbs when I was diagnosed with sleep apnea, but lost 112 lbs. Went back for another sleep study, but no change. Being male, over 40, and overweight definitely increases your risk of having sleep apnea, but not falling into one of those categories does not exclude the possibility of having sleep apnea.

BTW - I didn't think having the sleep study was that big a deal, by the time I took the first one I was so tired I could have slept on a picket fence, so a few wires and a mask didn't bother me in the least.

jim&pamsbike
25th August 2008, 16:53
For anyone that doesn't know, Reggie White (the ex Phila Eagles football player) died in his sleep from heart failure, at least partially attributed to untreated sleep apnea.

linkin5
25th August 2008, 18:21
Over weight people are the ones most prone to sleep apnea but skinny people also can be affected. It is the obstruction of the airway during sleep from the tissue in your throat. Symptom is snoring, as you relax during sleep the muscles in your throat area relax and the tissue falls into the airway, as you breathe this causes snoring. At some oint the tissue will obstruct your airway and you will become more awake and reopen your airway to breathe so you constantly go in and out of rem sleep and don't get the kind of rest your body needs. If untreated this can cause high blood pressue which puts you at risk for a cardiac event. If you take a bunch of drugs and forget to breathe that isn't sleep apnea it's an over dose.

rfranz1952
25th August 2008, 18:23
I was diagnosed about three years ago.

When I went in for the sleep study, my doc told me to plan for a day off the day after, as the study itself makes people tired--they have to wake you up a number of times, plus just being in a strange place with all the wires hooked up etc.

What's interesting, is that the techs who administer the study generally know the results, but can't tell you because they aren't md's.

When I did mine, I remember the tech waking me at some point, putting the mask on me and telling me that "this would make me feel better." He already knew! After just a few hours on the test machine, I felt better and more energized the next day than I had in years.

But

They still had to send the printouts to a specialiist, who took more than six weeks to get around to reading them. I finally went in to my Family Dr, and told him that I didn't care if the insurance paid for it or not, I didn't want tow ait any longer for the results--I would buy the machine myself. Rather "coincidently", I had the results within about 3 days, and have been on the machine ever since (the insurance did pay for it).

Fastfwd01
25th August 2008, 18:30
I think I have it. I used to wake up gasping. I haven’t done that in a pretty long time, but I do wake up frequently in the night and I very often have dry mouth. I’m overweight too.

MDT
25th August 2008, 23:24
I was a borderline nasal surgery case. I took to playing the Didgeridoo instead of surgery.

ed_in_az
26th August 2008, 00:00
Over weight people are the ones most prone to sleep apnea but skinny people also can be affected. It is the obstruction of the airway during sleep from the tissue in your throat. Symptom is snoring, as you relax during sleep the muscles in your throat area relax and the tissue falls into the airway, as you breathe this causes snoring. At some oint the tissue will obstruct your airway and you will become more awake and reopen your airway to breathe so you constantly go in and out of rem sleep and don't get the kind of rest your body needs. If untreated this can cause high blood pressue which puts you at risk for a cardiac event. If you take a bunch of drugs and forget to breathe that isn't sleep apnea it's an over dose.

2 years ago I had a cardiac workup due to an odd pain that hit me briefly. My blood pressure was normal and during the treadmill portion my doctor said I could quit anytime and I'd already be qualified for a fire fighter job. This year I was up to a high of 170/100 and headed for a stroke. I'm now on Lisinoprol and it's come down, but not to normal. This is from sleep apnea and pain, not weight, diet or age. Sleep apnea can wreck you heart. I've had cold neck sweats at night for years. I'll slowly wake up every 1 to 2 hours and sometimes feel a cold stream of sweat running down my neck. I was told this is due to the muscles straining to breathe. The heart is doing the same thing, straining. Blood pressure should go down at night and give the heart some rest too, but not for those with sleep apena.

If you take enough drugs (or alcohol!) to keep you asleep during a sleep apnea episode, when your throat shuts it's suffocation. It's not a matter of FORGETTING to breathe.

SpartanDen
26th August 2008, 00:17
I have sleep apnea and the CPAP as well. Have had for 6-7 years. Don't know if it is doing much now....seem to be tired when I get up and sometimes drowsey during the day. But then I only get about 6 hours per night. This should be enough right?
I also had my uvula (the little flapper at the back of your throat) removed along with scar tissue where my tonsils used to be.
There is also a new procedure for those who snore. It places some plastic rods (similar to a toothpick) in the tissue between your throad and nasal cavity. The purpose is to help eliminate the soft tissue from vibrating or flapping which causes you to snore. Don't know if it is worthwhile or not, but for someone who snores, this could be an option.
I have mixed emotions on the CPAP. I use it every night except if I travel for business (hassle to lug into a plane) and feel extremely comfortable using it. I sometimes wonder if I just plain need another hour or so of sleep per day. If I try to go to bed earlier ( usually 10pm and up at 5am) I usually am awake for 30-40 minutes earlier. Strange.

At any rate, I believe, as most of those here, that it is a good idea to do a sleep study if you do believe you have sleeping issues. one night out of many (for the sleep study) is a small sacrifice to pay if this helps!

My $0.02

ed_in_az
26th August 2008, 00:27
SpartanDen, I was told the level of flow is also important to keeping both the airway open and your oxygen level high enough. You might need you machine adjusted.

lobo56
26th August 2008, 00:36
i,ve had it for five years no being overweight dosent effect it my father died from it. chances are if you stop breathing it may not start up again, depends on how bad you have it it is the soft palite that falls over the airway constricting it, it may be corrected by surgery but very few people benifit from it as it dosent always work my older brother has it also some of the symptems are itching uncontrolable,,, damn like to have drove me nuts, jerking your self awake at night legs jerk snoring ha yea thats the one if you snore best have yourself tested becoming very tired during the day even after sleeping all night shit we all gotta die from sumthing though well they dont have to gut me when i,m gone to see what killed me ha hah ha, ps i live a normal life other than that damn mask eating my nose up .....

SpartanDen
26th August 2008, 02:16
yeah Ed....been thinking about that. Time to head back to the medical supply joint and have it checked. Thanks!!

NoBoZoS
26th August 2008, 02:25
Had a sleep study done twice...diagnosed with sleep apnea due to the up to 50 episodes per hour...can't wear the CPAP due to claustrophobia...so I go without and hope for the best...

SpartanDen
26th August 2008, 02:29
That sucks..... there are several different types of head gear available. I had the mask but did not like that. did not get a good seal due to the mustashe. now i have a deal that has silicone rubber deal that goes into my nostrals. better. maybe someday they'll come up with something you can use!

Lud
28th August 2008, 11:25
i've had issues with the "dongle" at the back of my throat swelling up and dropping over the airways in my sleep.. wake up like I'm suffocating...
pretty worrying when it happens...

mind you i can think of worse ways to go out then in your sleep huh.....

take care out there

jim&pamsbike
28th August 2008, 15:54
Lud,
Have you had a sleep study? Sounds like it could be some form of obstructive sleep apnea. Might be best to get checked.

onevette80
28th August 2008, 16:14
My 7th grade science project was "Can you detect sleep apnea using a temp sensor?" I had a temp sensor in a highflow respirator hooked to a computer that logged temp changes while you slept. instances where temp didnt change were obviously times when you quit breathing. My dad has sleep apnea, we didnt know how bad until I tested it on him. He then went to an actual sleep study where they found out he had severe sleep apnea and narcolepsy. He's had a cpap ever since. And only has to sleep half as long to get the equivilent rest.

alittle off topic, but, narcolepsy being genetic, all four of my fathers children have at least mild narcolepsy. Both my sisters are MDs and have to take adoral to practice. I sit at a desk all day so frequent naps are no prob. lol

ChuckinPA
28th August 2008, 20:00
I'm going on 2 years with a CPAP machine. Does it suck? Not really, it's just an annoyance that one has to get used to. There are many options available to adjust the machine for comfort (different masks, headgear, machine features, etc.).

The upside is that I feel 100% better. It is no longer a major battle with myself to get out of bed in the morning. I can drive a car on the highway without getting sleepy. I'm not cranky all the time. I can sit and watch a TV show without immediately falling asleep. I have energy to exercise. I haven't had an acid reflux problem since I went on the machine. I don't have to drink caffeine all day long just to stay barely awake.

Flying with the machine is not that big a deal, the TSA folks know what the machines are. Takes about 30 seconds longer going through the security gate. It doesn't count against the carry-on luggage count, as it's an "approved medical device."

My biggest problem is that haven't quite figured out how to go motorcycle/tent camping with it. I either would require access to an electrical outlet and carry an extension cord, or I'd have to go with some sort of heavy battery power unit. Neither option is foolproof, so it's been hotel rooms only for me since I got diagnosed. :(

Chuck

onevette80
28th August 2008, 21:37
My biggest problem is that haven't quite figured out how to go motorcycle/tent camping with it. I either would require access to an electrical outlet and carry an extension cord, or I'd have to go with some sort of heavy battery power unit. Neither option is foolproof, so it's been hotel rooms only for me since I got diagnosed. :(

Chuck

My dad has a extra car battery in the house, under his bed, that runs his CPAP automatically if the power goes out. Im thinking the battery on your bike wouldnt last long though. Hmmmmmm? I wonder what kind of load it pulls??????

buckhorns
28th August 2008, 21:58
My late wife died from sleep apnea in 01. I wish I would have woke up to wake her up.

unclesumo
5th October 2008, 16:34
I have been living with sleep apnea for over 15 years. When I was first diagnosed the Doc said if I didn't do something about then I would probably die within 5 years. It is now a fact of life, just something I do every day like eating and breathing. I literally fell asleep at the handle bars of an old Suzuki I had, woke up bouncing around in a bar ditch east of Colorado Springs, thank god I was able to control it, just missed getting hung up in a barbed wire fence. Now life is good, I have energy and sleep great, no headaches in the morning, the bipap machine I use is a blesing. Now all I have to do is get through the next few weeks of radiation treatment for my eye disease and life will be good again. I plan on riding my sporty every day to treatment, I put a radiation sticker on my helmet for a gag, the techs will think it's funny. Everybody stay safe, motorcycles are what keep us sane....:tour

ed_in_az
6th October 2008, 00:40
To Buckhorn: You have my condolences. It was a very lucky coincidence for me, that my wife woke up the one night I probably wouldnt' have.

Unclesumo: Congratulations on enyoing life and sleep.:clap Here's hoping all goes well with you treatments.

ed_in_az
6th October 2008, 00:47
I'm still getting the bugs worked out living with my CPAP machine. I've got a mask that seals well. My nightly neck sweats stopped immediately. But, I still wake up 2 or 3 times a night with a dry mouth. I'm going to call the Respiratory Therapist that does the testing and see if maybe I need to have the pressure setting increased on my machine. Because I wake up several times at night I'm still lacking in sleep, but I'm getting enough I once gain feel safe riding my Sporty to work.:)

rshute4
6th October 2008, 00:59
Not to self diagnose... but i think ill be going to the Doc, Ive had back pain pretty bad the last few years. The last 8 or so months Ive been getting all of the symptoms mentioned above, my wife has to take Tylenol PM so she can sleep in the bed. Ive been having to take more pain meds so i can "sleep" hell last night i got wasted hanging out with the neighbors and actually felt like i got some good sleep finally, but after 11am i was right back where i usually am. The wife keeps bringing up the sleep apnea, but me being a stubborn ass i keep playing it off... maybe i should anymore.

Barkster
25th January 2009, 17:42
One of the biggest things I have noticed after being diagnosed with sleep apnea and going on the CPAP machine is I don't hardly dream at all any more. Prior to being diagnosed I would have the wildest most vivid dreams you could imagine. When I mentioned the lack of dreaming to my respiratory doctor he told me I was most likley experiencing hallucinations from lack of oxygen.

DC in PHX
25th January 2009, 17:59
I was also diagnosed with SA. I could never get the C-PAP machine to work for me. I felt like I was being suffocated by it, believe it or not. at first it is fine, but it ramps up over 20 minutes pressure wise and it wakes me up because I feel like I am choking. I spent around $1000 in different head gear and such. The doc and respiratory therapist basically told me to suck it up and learn to live with it. I even repeated the sleep study, still no luck with it. So a $3000 C-PAP machine sits in my closet unused....

At least I get to die in my sleep:p:doh

good luck with it!! I hope it works for you:)

DC

nh roads
26th January 2009, 06:52
My brother uses a c-pap machine too I believe.
He's had cardiac problems from the age of 38.
And problems with weight and chlorestoral too.
I guess he's 54 now, and had a multiple by-pass surgery maybe 5 years ago now.

I don't know which problem came first.
He's done the sleep studies and had several different machines now I think.

Do you put water in these things?
I think I remember him telling a funny story about doing something wrong and nearly drowning himself one night.

He was my hero and a great motorcycle enthusiast when he was younger.
I wish he hadn't lost interest in it.

ed_in_az
8th February 2009, 05:15
I just noticed some new responses here.

Regarding the ramp up ... don't use that feature. I tried it once and hated it too. Mine has a C-Flex setting which starts at full blast, but senses your exhaling and causes a momentary pause in flow. It helps time my breaths since I have the combination sleep apnea. I use the #2 C-Flex setting, there are 3 for different degrees of pause.

You can get too much water if the machine is at or above the level of your bed. I was told to lower my machine 3" below the bed. It helps.

Sleep apnea is very bad for the heart, and everything else due to lack of oxygen.

Obviously I'm still using my machine. It's not a perfect solution even now, but:
1. The sleep I get while using it is much more efficient (restfull) than without it.
2. It beats dying ... at least until you're ready to go ... whenever that is.

I still wake up at night and have trouble getting to sleep at times. My mouth and throat still get parched, even with the humidifier on. I even sleep potions of some nights without the machine. Still, I'm glad I have it.

Even a bad night with the CPAP is more restfull than it was before, I don't have cold sweats, I can sleep on my back, and I don't snore.

I'm still taking meds for my blood pressure, but now the pressure is either normal or close to it when I check. My doctor doesn't tell me I'm headed for a heart attack anymore.:)

Keep working with you CPAP machines guys. It beats the alternative.:rolleyes:

66impala
8th February 2009, 08:01
www.cpap.com

Good web site for machines and supplies.
Ive used my machine for 5 plus years, I dont sleep without it now, like second nature. My wife gets a good nite sleep also, due to me not snooring. Going to sleep has never been a problem, its getting rest while your asleep, thats the purpose of the machine. If you have sleep apnea do use your machine, it may take some getting use to the mask, also dont use the ramp up option for the air pressure. I use full air pressure from the time I turn the machine on.

mrlowlight
8th February 2009, 08:28
I started to suffer from snoring and sleep apnoea many years ago, a natural therapist told me to change my diet and give up dairy products, as she felt I was lactose sensitive. I didn't follow her advice, put on weight over the years and the problems got worse. I finally got the message when my blood pressure started climbing to a point that concerned me. I changed my diet, lost weight and the problems went away. However, I still find it hard to be strict with my diet and when I stray, I suffer from sleep disturbance, wake up with headaches and lack of energy. I'm not saying here that this is the same for everybody, but it's worth looking into....often the simplest cures are the hardest to implement. I am very glad I don't have to use a cpap machine, as I get claustrophobic....got trapped in a pipe when I was a kid.

Barkster
27th February 2009, 17:42
"I still find it hard to be strict with my diet and when I stray, I suffer from sleep disturbance, wake up with headaches and lack of energy."

Mrlolight, Morning headaches, lack of energy & sleep disturbance are symptoms of sleep apnea. You may still have sleep apnea even though you lost weight and don't snore as much as you did when you were heavier. A simple sleep study at a sleep disorder clinic can tell for sure if you stop breathing during the night and how low your oxygen saturation levels in your blood are going. Sleep apnea isn't just a fat people's disease. Normal weight and thin people have it too.

kane
28th February 2009, 01:11
I have, or should I say had it badly.
I had it for years and thru 2 girlfriends. The difference in them was that the first one let me sleep on the couch concerned about her not getting to sleep but the next one stayed awake in the bed too concerned about wether I was going to die or not. God I miss the last one.

Anyways, I`ve had two surgereys, one to reduce the size of my tonsils and uvula and the next one to straighten up the wall between my nostrils ( the surgeon actually cut it out, flattened it with a hammer and sowed it back in) and have been fine since.

My brother has the CPAP and that works great for him but for me that was no option.

They said that I may have to get back to surgery in some years to block up the back of my nostrils but for now it`s great.

I sleep better at night and wake up normally tired and sleepy in the morning, not exhausted like before.

MadKaw
16th March 2009, 08:01
been on the CPAP for 2 years. the sleep study sucks, had to do mine twice. the second was with Ambien...that was the trick. I can't explain the difference in your sleep, energy levels and piece of mind that I won't have the health problems from this. If anybody has any thoughts of doing this...DO IT!!!!! the first week getting used to the mask is a pain, but after that is a gift.

brimic
16th March 2009, 13:50
I've been on a CPAP for 3 years now, I rarely sleep without it. When I do go without it, I usually feel groggy during the day and have a hard time staying awake the whole day, especially if I've been without the CPAP for more than 2 days. I've even woken up on nights without my CPAP with my heart racing.

The mask/ air pressure do not bother me in the least. Getting the temperature adjusted right is important, especially during the dry winter months. Too hot and you wake up with a mask dripping with water, too cold, any my sinuses get painfully dry. I don't use water in the summer. The biggest problem I've had to date has been the last week. I got a scratch on my nose and it got infected- I think it might be from the mask/water as I don't clean the mask as often as I should and only change the water every other day.

Overall, the CPAP treatment has made a huge positive impact on my quality of life. I have a lot more energy and have lost a lot of weight.

Gone
16th March 2009, 15:04
I was diagnosed with SA in November; but, so far, I am lucky. I was told that most (95%) of my apnea episodes occur when I sleep on my back. Dr recommended a Dr. Parkers snore relief pillow. It is a soft backpack with an inflatable pillow in it which does not allow me to sleep on my back. All I can say is, wow, I should have had the test at least ten years ago. No more waking up exhausted, no more night sweats, no more falling asleep driving home, no more falling asleep at work, and, best of all, I am not worried about not waking up one day. :banana
For those who for one reason or another can't use the CPAP, ask your Dr. about positional therapy.

ed_in_az
17th March 2009, 20:53
Reading about the importance of position reminded me of what I experienced sleeping on a folding futon bed we had in a spare bedroom for awhile. Down flat it was a queen size bed, but folded up it was an approximately 6' couch. It had a very ... very comfortable foam cushion/mattress. Sleeping on it in couch mode, I couldn't roll over on my back. Wow did I sleep good. It may be moving from our garage back into a bedroom when our daughter moves out. I'll have to try it again then.:)

Gone
18th March 2009, 03:29
Try the positioning pillow, I think it was $60. If the futon helped, the pillow may too.

Pringles21
12th April 2012, 00:43
I don't like reviving old threads but why make a new one.

About 3 weeks ago I was diagnosed with Sleep Apnea. I've been seeing a sleep specialist for about 2 years now for Excessive daytime sleepiness. Im 19 now and I had my first sleep study about 2 years ago and I only had one occurrence of apnea during that study. My mom said that I would stop breathing sometimes in my sleep, I've slept walked, I have taken a shower in my sleep too, I woke up with headaches multiple times a week, and I was just exhausted. I also had a MSLT test to see how fast I hit REM sleep, and I hit REM sleep within 4-5 minutes each time for the 5 naps. The doc believed I may have narcolepsy so he got me on a med (provigil) for the time being as we would not know for sure for a few years and a few more tests. Anyway the provigil sort of helped but that made my headaches worse so I stopped taking it and my doc ok'd it.

Fast-forward to a few weeks ago my doc ordered another sleep test to compare to my last one. During this test I stopped breathing about 35 times per hour. He immediately ordered a cpap machine for me and yesterday I got it and was instructed on how to use it. The guy who taught us told us that it usually takes about two weeks to get used to it and find a mask that's comfortable. The doc told me I may still have narcolepsy but we wont know for a few months of using the cpap machine and another sleep study.

I've felt tired during the day and have had headaches since I was about 14-15. I was in football playing d-line in high school and weighed 205 5'8" freshmen year and was very active. Now I currently weigh 235 and I'm 5'11". My weight has varied from 220-260 the past two and a half years. Dieting and exercise help but exercise is hard to do when you just don't have the energy to do it. I'm going to work on getting my weight down to 220 and being able to bench press 10 reps of 215 lbs, and running a mile in 8:00 mins just like after I left football by the end of summer. I'll have more energy to ride too :tour

fusion213
12th April 2012, 01:18
I was diagnosed with sleep apnea when I was 19. I would stop breathing roughly 80 times an hour. I had a cpap which made me feel better, but I hated using it. I was going to join the marine corps so I started exercising. At 6'2", Going from 240 to 225 eliminated my sleep apnea.
I highly recommend exercise.

Gone
12th April 2012, 03:28
Hey Fusion, You are one of the few I've ever heard that cured themself. I've had it for 12 years. I went from 235 to 185lbs. with an exercise program and still have it. I hope you are cured, and am not doubting your claim. My Dr. told me once you have it, you always do. That's just from my experience.

fusion213
12th April 2012, 03:49
It was on accident, I didn't know weight loss would fix it. I probably still have it if I go above 240lbs. I'm also a lot more muscle now than back then so it may be even higher.
Last year I requested my sleep study to fix some of my college grades from when it was affecting me. That's when I saw a recommendation to lose weight.

Gone
12th April 2012, 04:35
Hey Bro, Good for you. I think I'm probably older than you and have more health problems that contribute to the SA. I'm a retired Director of Safety for FMCSA and was taught about this condition through work, but didn't know I even had it till other health problems arose. I wish you continued success.