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69 A-Body
30th September 2008, 19:27
I was laying in bed last night about 9:30 when I hear a bike start up out back. I think that's weird, no one else around me has a bike with pipes, when it hits me, HOLY S**T, I think that's my bike. I'm on leave since I just had ACL surgery 3 weeks ago and I’m still on crutches so I can't get down the stairs fast enough. My garage is a detached 3-Car and is in the backyard. I open the back door just in time to hear someone ripping outta the neighborhood on my bike. F'ing thieves! Even took a six-pack of B'light outta my beer fridge.

We've had a rash of garage break-ins over the past few months so always ensure all my garage and fence doors are locked. But, sure enough, they got it. When I got outside both the two car and single car door were wide open and the back man door was wide open. It looks like what they did was slide a wire through the top of the single car door to hook the emergency open cable and popped it open. Once they got that open they pried open the man door and went to town.

In sense I'm lucky all they took was the bike. Sitting right next to it is my restored 69 Chevelle that's got a lot more money and time into it. Not to mention all my tools, military gear, etc.... I think they did plan on coming back though because they stole the garage door opener outta my wife’s jeep. So, we just killed the breakers to the doors last night.

I'm waiting til 8:00 so I can call the insurance company. HPD says I've got a pretty slim chance of ever seeing it again. I guess the moral is, if they want it they're gonna get it.

Anybody deal with claiming a stolen bike before? Are they gonna stick it to me or do they take mods into consideration?

Here's a few pics for anybody in Hawaii. It's a one of a kind on the island so:

http://xlforum.net/photopost/watermark.php?file=35476

http://xlforum.net/photopost/watermark.php?file=16425

scottgearman
30th September 2008, 19:34
My understanding is that with bikes, Insurance companies put it on you to tell them everytime you add to the value and they raise your rates accordingly.... SO, since NONE of us do that, they will find the market value of a stock bike the same age as yours and subtract the deductable and roll the cheque into a tiny cylender and apply some lube...... sorry, I got carried away.

Sorry to hear you lost your bike

el jinete fantasma
30th September 2008, 19:36
Sorry to hear about your bike... nice scoot!

Lenster
30th September 2008, 19:37
Sorry to hear that man. That really sucks. As far as your insurance claim goes, you're probably SOL on any upgrades, unless you told your insurance company about them prior and had them insured as well, at least that is my experience.

Folkie
30th September 2008, 19:59
Really sorry to hear about this. As to whether you're mods are covered on your insurance, I guess it depends on your insurance: are they desclared, and does the sum insured include them?

loki03xlh
30th September 2008, 20:04
sorry about your bike....as far a insurance, it delpends on who you have. Progressive gives a grand for accessories without jacking up your rate.

Nf4Joe
30th September 2008, 20:07
Man that is pretty sh*tty. Was a nice bike for sure.

Kwest187
30th September 2008, 20:16
That F_ing sucks...well the island is only so big...I'd hire a PI and let him do the digging and it wouldn't surprise me if he found it within a week...then you decide...call in the authorities or keep the dirty bastard locked up in your garage...feeding him only maggots and spoiled pork until he dies a long painful death from the inside out-

69 A-Body
30th September 2008, 20:28
Thanks all, it was a nice skoot... Waiting to hear from the adjuster. I'm sure I'll be waiting for a day or two. You'd think that the island being only so big we wouldn't have a lot of vehicle thefts but I was surprised when I talke to HPD last night. He said that most cars that are stolen get joy ridden than burned down the same night while most bikes get parted out. Doesn't seem HPD has a good recovery rate on stolen bikes. I'm affraid what's already happened is that it's either sitting over in a container or it's already been stripped for it's parts. Hell, the front end with all the parts is worth over 2k new.

KaotikEvo
30th September 2008, 20:29
damn dude that sux !!! when dealing with the insurance co. just close your eyes and squeeze your ankles with both hands as hard as you can, then count backwards from 20.

Vegas1200C
30th September 2008, 20:32
If your bike insurance doesn't cover something but you have documentation of it, try your homeowners/renters insurance (if you have it) since it was stolen from your home it should be covered there.

wilbur
30th September 2008, 20:33
SUX!

You should have an advantage to finding it though...

brprider
30th September 2008, 20:38
Sorry to hear about your bike. The world is full of low life a$$holes. I've got Allstate and they give $1500 for aftermarket parts. Collect your reciepts and all the recent photos you can get for the underwriters. Good luck

Krypto
30th September 2008, 20:43
Sorry to hear about your loss. It's gotta really SUCK!!:(:(:(
As for the insurance and the upgrades, you got a lot of photos so that might help.
Question: where was the key?

KaotikEvo
30th September 2008, 20:47
i dont know how it works in HI, but in NY homeowners/renters ins. will not cover anything that is titled and registered. it may cover contents, but its doubtful for a bike without bags.

alchemist68
30th September 2008, 20:48
Just terrible. Hope you find the bike, and the SOB that took it.

alchemist68

trosga1
30th September 2008, 22:13
sorry about your bike....as far a insurance, it delpends on who you have. Progressive gives a grand for accessories without jacking up your rate.

Man, that's horrible. I agree with loki, I've got progressive and they'll cover up to $1,000 of add on's without having a rider or detailed documentation (I just up'ed my policy for paint, parts , etc..) I'm also considering lojack.

I hope you get lucky and get it back, but more importantly I hope the insurance company treats you right.

Bob F
30th September 2008, 22:28
Start watching Ebay for your parts. Shipping costs will be the give-a-way that they are near you. Good luck.

tandk1597
1st October 2008, 15:36
Sorry to hear it dude..it sucks...nothing worse than a bike theif in my book.

Desertfox
1st October 2008, 15:48
Yep, you're pretty much ewscrayed. Unless you have a special insurance policy that covers mods and add ons. that gets spendy and not all insurance compainies even offer it. If you kept it locked, in a locked garrage, you were at home, and the bastards stole it anyway, that pretty freakin' BOLD. They probably would have had no compunction about shooting you if you had tried to stop them. So unless you were willing and able to confront them with a sawed off pump shotgun, there was probably nothing to do anyway.

pbudrovic
1st October 2008, 15:48
Sorry to hear about that.

Flamin883
1st October 2008, 15:59
Man that really sucks, I feel for ya. My insurance Aerican Family will cover any add ons that I Have reciets for. costs like 7-10 dollers extra a year. that was a lot cheaper than paying for a 1200. It was the agents Idea to do it that way

cantolina
1st October 2008, 16:14
Question: where was the key?

Doesn't matter....

Unless you're using the neck-lock or fork lock (and how many of us do that at home?), ANYONE can have your bike started and gone inside of ten seconds...All it takes is a safety pin....run it thru 3 wires, and the bike is running....

Sorry for your loss, man...

As said, unless you have insured the upgrades, you do have limitations....and if you don't have receipts, its hard to even get that extra grand or so, if you have that on your rider.... :frownthre

chacon101
1st October 2008, 18:16
Doesn't matter....

Unless you're using the neck-lock or fork lock (and how many of us do that at home?), ANYONE can have your bike started and gone inside of ten seconds...All it takes is a safety pin....run it thru 3 wires, and the bike is running....


You scare me.

Does this still apply if you have the factory alarm?

bigjnsa
1st October 2008, 18:21
Doesn't matter....

Unless you're using the neck-lock or fork lock (and how many of us do that at home?), ANYONE can have your bike started and gone inside of ten seconds...All it takes is a safety pin....run it thru 3 wires, and the bike is running....


Not that I'm condoning stealing a bike, I'd like to know how to do this in case I ever lose my key.

69 A-Body
1st October 2008, 18:56
Thanks all, still haven't heard anything from HPD. I did talk to Geico and did a recorded interview for about 20 minutes. When I asked her how many bikes get returned on the island she just kind of snickered and told me not many. HPD gets 14 days after which Geico will declare it a total loss. Damn, I had planned on getting another bike but not getting rid of the sporty.

Every time I hear something nearby with pipes on it I get depressed. It's just amazing how easy it seemed for them. The wife and I were talking and even though the bike's gone it could've been a lot worse. Had they decided to put the bike on a truck rather than starting it I never would've gone downstairs that night to check on it. That would have left them plenty of time to completely empty my garage of all my tools and take the Chevelle as well. I don't know if they expected it to be as loud as it is, its got baffle less Bassani drag pipes, and no, the keys weren't in it.

As far as the bike getting taken, the only thing I can figure is they knew the bike was in there. I just don't think they realized what else was in the garage which is why they swiped the garage door openers so they could return.

Again, thanks everyone.

bigjnsa
1st October 2008, 19:03
As far as the bike getting taken, the only thing I can figure is they knew the bike was in there. I just don't think they realized what else was in the garage which is why they swiped the garage door openers so they could return.

Again, thanks everyone.

I think the majority of thieves are pretty stupid. When I was in car stereo a LONG time ago I had a pretty badass system. Came out one morning and the passenger side back window was smashed in. I'm thinking sh$$ what's gone... I open the door and surprisingly everything was still here.. CDs, amps, subs, speakers.. everything... Now you ask what was missing?? my just BOUGHT fricking prescription sunglasses!

wandrur
1st October 2008, 19:04
Wow, sorry to hear it. That's why I have mine Lojacked--it at least gives me a better chance of getting it recovered.

Wishing you the best.

LuckyB
1st October 2008, 19:08
That sucks man, sry to hear it.

funnythebunny
1st October 2008, 20:53
Wow, sorry to hear it. That's why I have mine Lojacked--it at least gives me a better chance of getting it recovered.

Wishing you the best.

Wandrur, please don't take this as a personal attack, just good advice from a fellow XLF'r...

I hate to be bearer of bad news, but your LoJack ain't worth more than an insurance discount. LoJack (Design # LJ1, LJ2 and LJ3) was originally designed for automibiles, where paneling, carpeting and body panels help to hide and protect them, provided there's a 12V constant power source to keep the internal battery charged.

The newest LJ3 can be upgraded with an Early Warning System, which would alert you via phone, text and email, if your vehicle has been moved more than a 100 ft without your personalized keyFob present (which you would need to carry with you, not on your keychain).

Their next design (SJU and RJU) was a ruggerized unit that could be mounted on construction equipment and is water resistant, since most construction equipment does get wet all over. Great for forklifts, backhoes, compressors, light carts and trailers. What's the flaw? Their batteries need to be constantly monitored since a lot of construction equipment have main battery disconnects for storage and/or reduce the chances of batteries getting stolen from job sites.

Their latest system, which was originally designed for small watercrafts, but eventually used in powersports, was their smallest unit ever, with a built in battery and transmitter which can be monitored and tested from a hand held terminal, therefore reducing maintenance labor. Flaw? The installation of these systems were actually handed over to the dealers, where a Certified Dealer Installer will perform the installation. Although these installers work for the dealer and trained by LoJack Quality Control Inspectors (QCI's), the background checks and bonding of these CDI's are controlled by the dealer's Service Departments. The mechanics are doing the installations and are paid only a .6 hr labor rate. That means, that they do not have the time to invest in searching for a different location on every bike. Harleys and other "naked" cruisers suffer the most as there aren't many places to hide a box about the size of a cigarrette pack, plus wiring and antenna. The mechanics have been handed a box with the same plugs and brackets designed for each model bike, so there is no originality in hiding such a small unit.

Had this poor fellow had a LoJack on his bike, he would have had a 50/50 chance of finding it, since he heard it the moment it was started, and immediately called the police. The other fifty percent would have been lost to the police department's policy. Here's why...

LoJack is not contacted by the police when a vehicle gets stolen, and even if you call them yourself it still does not help you. The police must phisically take a stolen vehicle police report, then enter the vehicle's information into the National Data Crime Computer Network, then the system would send out a signal through a series of cell towers to the stolen unit, activating it's transmitter. The unit will begin to transmit a signal that can be tracked by triagulating the signal's direction and intensity. NOT all police cars have the ability to track, only those units which have been equipped with tracking devices (known as trackers). (Hint: Only police cars with four antennas in a square pattern on the roof are trackers). Most police trackers don't want to be bothered, so they remove the antennas off their units, since the recievers are designed to stay on at all times. So now your chances of recovery are down to a 50/50 chance of a tracker in the area with all the antennas in place.

So NOW, how comfortable do you feel with your LoJack? Ever think that the same installer could be the same person that knows where you live, and that you have a LoJack in it, and an associate has been paying him for that info? Did a background check of this individual was ever made, or was this guy a bike mechanic that was hired just because the shop needed a mechanic? How long ago was the bike stolen before you found out? How long is it taking the police to file your stolen vehicle report?

Don't get me wrong, the system was designed to aid in the recovery of stolen vehicles; and with a 75% recovery rate, it beats having none. But these statistics only apply to cars, trucks and construction equipment with LoJacks installed by MECP (Mobile Electronic Certification Program) Certified Loack installers, whose background checks, extensive drug testing and financial reports are checked periodically and are fully bonded by LoJack Corporation.

As a former LoJack Installer, Shift Supervisor and eventually a QCI before leaving for a better paying job, I know that a quality installation means a high chance or recovery. Both my cars are LoJacked, but my bikes, I wouldn't trust the Stealership to perform the installation and take the steps and precautions that LJ Corp puts into their own customers.

What about a factory alarm? His chances of theft would have been a lot less. Why? On a 2004 XL, the alarm module actually replaces the turn signal module (TSM) with a Turn Signal / Security Module (TSSM), which is located under the battery, and is wired to communicate with the ECM. Once the alarm is turned on, you would need to replace BOTH TSSM and ECM, and have them paired up before installing it, before you can get the bike to start.
Lost your remote and forgot the bypass turn signal entry code? Too bad, go to the Stealership for new parts, since there's no bypassing it in any other way.

I do hope that this fellow gets compensated by the insurance company for his losses. But lesson learned, an expensive one, but still learned perhaps. Was the bike's fork lock engaged? Did he have a disc lock on it? What about a factory alarm? Did he have one, and was it on? What about an OnGuard safety chain or cable? All of these things would have played an important role.

Don't expect the bike to be found just because you have LoJack. And even if you did, and it got stolen, would you want it back, whatever condition was found in? Will the insurance cover all your losses? Will LoJack help you cover your losses not paid by the insurance? Or you you rather spend a few more buck to prevent it in the first place.

Although it may or may not apply in this case, Benjamin Franklyn said it best, "An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure".

krono
1st October 2008, 21:17
I really sorry to know about your loss. That was a really nice bike, very well customized, nice taste.
I usually leave my bikes tied up to the wall, even if it is on my own garage. (I use 5 locks + alarm + LoJack tracking device on each of the two harleys) The locks are 2 disck locks, 1 U lock on rear wheel, 1 huge hexagonal chain to wall, 1 huge padlock that blocks front wheel.
You had your bike locked?

Also, now reading about long LoJack post.
I had lots of troubles installing a power commander III on my bike, mainly because some wires that werent there in the dynojet install diagram... are them the lojack wires??? because I have lojack on 2 bikes, and I have worked on the electrical system of both many times, but I never found the lojack box

besides, I'm quite scared because here the bikes usually are stolen in the violent bullet-to-the-rider method. Thefts here are dumb enough to not be able to start a bike, so they just shoot you in the street while riding and get the bike. Hope to don't attract bad mojo to me.

64physhy
1st October 2008, 21:55
Sorry to hear it. doesn't seem like it would be hard to find on an island, unless they export it. Everyone around there should put poisoned bud-light in their garage refrigerators so next time, the guy gets what he deserves.

funnythebunny
1st October 2008, 23:34
Krono, I'd tell you where it is, but then I'd have to kill you.. :D

Takingabreak
1st October 2008, 23:48
That does suck, it is either been parted out of in a container bound for Japan.

wandrur
2nd October 2008, 00:13
funnythebunny,
While, of course, I cannot argue with your experience, I can still quibble with a couple of the assumptions in your post (and, no, I'm not responding because I feel attacked).

1) Calling it a 50/50 chance is more than a little arbitrary. While logically accurate, I don't know that it is realistically honest to present a yes/no about recovery.

2) The description of my Lojack said it also has a backup battery. Would this not be helpful if wires were yanked, i.e., the unit should still be able to transmit a signal. *If* this is the case, the unit would need to be disposed of or destroyed to eliminate the chance of the police accurately tracking it, correct?

3) Despite having recently had a bull:censor run-in with the police, I still believe that the vast majority of officers take pride in their work. Saying that "not all" cruisers have trackers and that "most" don't to be bothered is, I think, a bit of a grand claim. I would assume--and I'm qualifying it as *purely* an assumption--that such technology would be available to most PDs in at least some form. Or, perhaps the State Patrol, even...?

4) Oh, how I do love conspiracies, too, and perhaps the tech who installed my unit is on the dole of a local bike thief. Perhaps. I think, though, that the cops might be able to track patterns of bike thefts, if they happened to be occurring, thus increasing the chances that such a nefarious crew would be apprehended and tossed in the slammer (with the co-conspiring tech alongside them).

That being said, if Lojack is really as (more or less) useless as you say it is, why hasn't someone created some sort of outcry toward dealers? I'm all for raising a ruckus when someone seems to be lying to me about the benefits of something that ends up being a waste of money and time. If it's really as bad as you say it is, perhaps we need to create some consumer information spreading, yes?

Despite all this, yes, I do feel better having the unit installed. Many car thieves are small time and not intelligent enough to snip all the loose ends when it comes to possibly being caught thieving whatever it is that they are thieving. Certainly, the rings are more adept at such things, but their size also complicates their secrecy. But, back to the point, if there's something we can do as consumers that is better, then let's have it. If what we're buying is not actually benefiting us, then let's find a way to stop people from having the wool pulled over their eyes. Which is to say, of course, that we need reliable proof--verifiable and reproducible--that we can use to support our claims.

Kobo
2nd October 2008, 00:20
Really sorry about that. The bike was gorgeous. My sister used to live in Hawaii and what a beautiful place to ride in. Hope you get a decent check so you can get another scoot.

funnythebunny
2nd October 2008, 01:36
funnythebunny,
While, of course, I cannot argue with your experience, I can still quibble with a couple of the assumptions in your post (and, no, I'm not responding because I feel attacked).

1) Calling it a 50/50 chance is more than a little arbitrary. While logically accurate, I don't know that it is realistically honest to present a yes/no about recovery.

2) The description of my Lojack said it also has a backup battery. Would this not be helpful if wires were yanked, i.e., the unit should still be able to transmit a signal. *If* this is the case, the unit would need to be disposed of or destroyed to eliminate the chance of the police accurately tracking it, correct?

3) Despite having recently had a bull:censor run-in with the police, I still believe that the vast majority of officers take pride in their work. Saying that "not all" cruisers have trackers and that "most" don't to be bothered is, I think, a bit of a grand claim. I would assume--and I'm qualifying it as *purely* an assumption--that such technology would be available to most PDs in at least some form. Or, perhaps the State Patrol, even...?

4) Oh, how I do love conspiracies, too, and perhaps the tech who installed my unit is on the dole of a local bike thief. Perhaps. I think, though, that the cops might be able to track patterns of bike thefts, if they happened to be occurring, thus increasing the chances that such a nefarious crew would be apprehended and tossed in the slammer (with the co-conspiring tech alongside them).

That being said, if Lojack is really as (more or less) useless as you say it is, why hasn't someone created some sort of outcry toward dealers? I'm all for raising a ruckus when someone seems to be lying to me about the benefits of something that ends up being a waste of money and time. If it's really as bad as you say it is, perhaps we need to create some consumer information spreading, yes?

Despite all this, yes, I do feel better having the unit installed. Many car thieves are small time and not intelligent enough to snip all the loose ends when it comes to possibly being caught thieving whatever it is that they are thieving. Certainly, the rings are more adept at such things, but their size also complicates their secrecy. But, back to the point, if there's something we can do as consumers that is better, then let's have it. If what we're buying is not actually benefiting us, then let's find a way to stop people from having the wool pulled over their eyes. Which is to say, of course, that we need reliable proof--verifiable and reproducible--that we can use to support our claims.


I hear you. From personal experience, the system is good, and with a 75 to 80% recovery rate, it is good investment, in an automobile market. As for motorcycles, bikes can be disassembled in less than an hour, that's less time time it takes to activate the system. By then the thieves would have already removed and disposed of the "black box" (that only gets hooked up to a pos+ and a neg-). That is unless the crook wants the bike complete as a whole, then you're good and protected.

From a stockholder point of view, it's a great investment. From a police standpoint, a great tool against car theft prevention and recovery (as well as a boost of morale when officers get rewards for LoJack recoveries). From a car dealer's, it's a great upsell incentive for a salesperson. For an install technician's point, an easy install in no time at all. From a QCI, a nightmare to test, evaluate and many times, re-install to assure recovery rates. My biggest worry was having too many dealers to visit to perform quality inspections after an install and before delivery of every car. Motorcycle dealers do not have QCI inspections since the last time I spoke to a colleague, and that's what worries me. If the unit actually worked for motorcycles as good as for cars, I would have it installed in my bikes, since my employee discount price as a former employee (who left in good terms) is around $125.00. However, it would require "professional installation" and that would mean taking it to the motorcycle dealer's CDI. (QCI's are not allowed to perform installations; only inspections, tests and repairs).

The 50/50 chances are for motorcycles, not cars and trucks. As for the police, LoJack provides and installs Tracking Units to all Police Departments, with a 10-20% of all cruisers to be equipped to be trackers. LOOK around you, at every police car that passes you by. How many of those police cars have the 4 antennas in a square pattern mounted on the back of the roofs? ONLY those cars are equipped to track. And only when a signal is triagulated and strong enough can they actually engage.

The back-up battery on newer LJ Units needed to be small enough to fit inside their smaller housings. So now the standby power was reduced from 2 weeks down to 7 days. The transmit power went from 96 hours down to 36 hours. Unit trasmission times were also reduced dramatically back in 2002. That's not long enough in my opinion and experience.

There are great cops out there, who love catching thieves. They live for the rush of a "live" track and trap. However, many of their cars are not equipped for tracking, so they rely only on radio calls.

Don't just take my word for it,
click here...http://www.freqofnature.com/index.php?m=Common&p=LoJack

If your vehicle is not recoverd within 24 hours, LoJack will refund you the price of the LoJack (up to 695.00), provided it's still under warranty. Which is primarily the main reason why many consumers don't complain.

As for crooked installers, they're around...

jrossty
2nd October 2008, 01:43
Well.... What can you do... All I know is, that if in my right mind and if I'd have heard it happen, I'd be in my car following them with the police on the line... or talking to the cops with the f'ing theives throat under my foot... :D
(if I was lucky I suppose)

NKGMAN
7th December 2009, 13:09
I was laying in bed last night about 9:30 when I hear a bike start up out back. I think that's weird, no one else around me has a bike with pipes, when it hits me, HOLY S**T, I think that's my bike. I'm on leave since I just had ACL surgery 3 weeks ago and I’m still on crutches so I can't get down the stairs fast enough. My garage is a detached 3-Car and is in the backyard. I open the back door just in time to hear someone ripping outta the neighborhood on my bike. F'ing thieves! Even took a six-pack of B'light outta my beer fridge.

We've had a rash of garage break-ins over the past few months so always ensure all my garage and fence doors are locked. But, sure enough, they got it. When I got outside both the two car and single car door were wide open and the back man door was wide open. It looks like what they did was slide a wire through the top of the single car door to hook the emergency open cable and popped it open. Once they got that open they pried open the man door and went to town.

In sense I'm lucky all they took was the bike. Sitting right next to it is my restored 69 Chevelle that's got a lot more money and time into it. Not to mention all my tools, military gear, etc.... I think they did plan on coming back though because they stole the garage door opener outta my wife’s jeep. So, we just killed the breakers to the doors last night.

I'm waiting til 8:00 so I can call the insurance company. HPD says I've got a pretty slim chance of ever seeing it again. I guess the moral is, if they want it they're gonna get it.

Anybody deal with claiming a stolen bike before? Are they gonna stick it to me or do they take mods into consideration?

Here's a few pics for anybody in Hawaii. It's a one of a kind on the island so:

http://xlforum.net/photopost/watermark.php?file=35476

http://xlforum.net/photopost/watermark.php?file=16425

That Bike is probably all ready in Japan,and rest assure they were no ordinary theives that got it. Also a good heads up to all that read this. Running out of the door as fast as you can be the worst action you take. You could run into a baseball bat or worse by their "back up". They know thats gonna be your first reaction. As for me, if you come into my "compound" and you dont belong there ,youll be found there in the morning, I assure you. That goes for my campsite also. Sorry about your loss.

G-Man U.S.M.C 67/71 Viet Nam 68/69 P.O.W M.I.A NEVER FORGET