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crashin
26th June 2007, 21:49
I posted in a different thread at first, but I decided I really should have started a new topic.
I need advice for good places to rent a motorcycle in Ireland. I am thinking I may start in the Shannon area since I am flying in and out of that airport so I wouldn't have to pay a car and a motorcycle rental for a day.

Is there anything I need to be particularly aware of as far as riding a motorcycle in Ireland goes?

I would greatly appreciate any and all advice. :)

harleytom
12th November 2007, 16:25
when are you thinking of goin to ireland or have you been

Folkie
12th November 2007, 16:58
harleytom, you live in a beautiful area. I've visited a few times, and the Dingle penninsular is one of my favourite areas. I love the Connor Pass. I'm also interested in the old railway, and have spent quite a lot of time searching out some of the remains.

beuz
12th November 2007, 17:06
Crashin wrote : "Is there anything I need to be particularly aware of as far as riding a motorcycle in Ireland goes? "

Not really.
You just have to be prepared to ride in the left side of the road...
Well seriously, you need good brakes, new tires, warm clothes, a very good rain suit.
Weather can change very quickly as in the Connemara....
Prefer a full face helmet.
Never ride fast on small roads, lambs and sheeps are sometimes having a rest in the middle of the road.
(bad surprise after a big turn !!!)
Roads are very abrasive that's why I told you to have new tires.
As in France, the price of gas is high, very high for american people !!!

Well, it's a very nice country with very nice people...
I went there twice and I hope coming back soon...

Some nice pics of my last trip, there :

http://i22.servimg.com/u/f22/11/00/68/87/p4160010.jpg

http://i22.servimg.com/u/f22/11/00/68/87/p4160011.jpg

http://i22.servimg.com/u/f22/11/00/68/87/p4170010.jpg

http://i22.servimg.com/u/f22/11/00/68/87/p4190010.jpg

And of course, the wonderful temple bars of Dublin :

http://i22.servimg.com/u/f22/11/00/68/87/p4200010.jpg

http://i22.servimg.com/u/f22/11/00/68/87/p4200011.jpg

whittlebeast
12th November 2007, 17:10
I would be very carful driving in any country that drives on the other side of the road. All you instincts will be wrong. I am American and found driving in England and Ireland, at the very minimum, a challange. Great place to go if you are from the USA. We loved it.

I forgot about the sheep:)

AW

http://www.ncs-stl.com/ireland/floor%20054%20(Medium).jpg

beuz
12th November 2007, 17:14
Even if you're from Brittany !!!
(celtic blood !!!)

Folkie
12th November 2007, 17:17
ConnemaraNow you're talking!
http://i22.servimg.com/u/f22/11/00/68/87/p4160011.jpgWhere is that please?

Folkie
12th November 2007, 17:22
One practical point worth pointing out: on a lot of the roads there is a fairly wide shoulder delineated by a yellow line. It's normal practice for a slower vehicle to pull over onto this shoulder to let faster vehicles past. Watch out if you do this though, as the road surface outside the yellow line can be very rough!

whittlebeast
12th November 2007, 17:34
I have lots of photos at http://www.ncs-stl.com/ireland

It's the ones that start with floor. I was too lazy to rename them.

I have high res photos if anyone wants to print one. Just PM me with a real email address.

AW

beuz
12th November 2007, 17:45
Now you're talking!
Where is that please?

This place is called Roundstone.
I just stopped to have a fresh Guinness and listen to Irish
traditionnal music...

More views of this nice harbor :

http://i22.servimg.com/u/f22/11/00/68/87/p4160012.jpg

http://i22.servimg.com/u/f22/11/00/68/87/p4160013.jpg

Folkie
12th November 2007, 18:56
This place is called Roundstone.
I just stopped to have a fresh Guinness and listen to Irish
traditionnal music...

More views of this nice harbor :

http://i22.servimg.com/u/f22/11/00/68/87/p4160012.jpg

http://i22.servimg.com/u/f22/11/00/68/87/p4160013.jpgI thought it was! We stayed there for a few nights on one of our holidays there. I bought a bodhrán. Funny place County Galway, is some ways. There's only three towns: Galway, Roundstone, and Clifden. The countryside is bare and wild and earily beautiful.

jharback
12th November 2007, 19:02
I posted in a different thread at first, but I decided I really should have started a new topic.
I need advice for good places to rent a motorcycle in Ireland. I am thinking I may start in the Shannon area since I am flying in and out of that airport so I wouldn't have to pay a car and a motorcycle rental for a day.

Is there anything I need to be particularly aware of as far as riding a motorcycle in Ireland goes?

I would greatly appreciate any and all advice. :)

I've never seen such crazy drivers in the country side in my life and I live in Italy. The roads are great for motorcycle riding. Lots of twisties and beautiful views, however, their extremely narrow and have stone walls right up to the pavement.

I had rented a car while there and all of the car rental places tell you up front that if you destroy a tire you pay for it. That's because theres lots of potholes and break-offs at the edge of the roads. The roads are so narrow that you frequently have to drive the edge (about six inches from the stone walls) and they go thru tires like you would not believe. I considered myself lucky and only had to buy one.

Have fun, its a great country.

beuz
12th November 2007, 19:06
I prefer Irish drivers than french drivers....

humpbackbob
12th November 2007, 19:15
The only HD Dealer with Rentals that I found is in Northern Ireland in Antrim, called Provincewide Harley Davidson. It is not too far to travel. Actually the train is pretty good. I am sure there must be dealers in Eire but not on the HD site? If you havn't already been, have a great time. Oh, and beware the Guinness is much stronger over there.:laugh

beuz
12th November 2007, 19:15
I thought it was! We stayed there for a few nights on one of our holidays there. I bought a bodhrán. Funny place County Galway, is some ways. There's only three towns: Galway, Roundstone, and Clifden. The countryside is bare and wild and earily beautiful.

I stayed for 3 nights at Oughterard, to visit Galway, Inishmore and to admire the wonderful Connemara landscapes.
Then, I went up to Sligo for 2 more nights and came back to Dublin for 2 days. A week was too short to see everything..

First time I came to Ireland (1990) I stayed for a month in a small place, near Navan, called Castletown.
I was student and wanted to improve my english. A complete month without a french word !!!

I really want to go back to visit the Kerry county.

Folkie
12th November 2007, 19:30
I had rented a car while there and all of the car rental places tell you up front that if you destroy a tire you pay for it. That's because theres lots of potholes and break-offs at the edge of the roads.I didn't think the roads were too bad really; not that different to some of the roads back home. Mind you, on one of our trips a tyre developed a slow puncture which we discovered after we'd got off the ferry on the way back, so I suppose you may have a point. :) Until now I hadn't particularly put it down to the roads in Ireland.

The roads are so narrow that you frequently have to drive the edge (about six inches from the stone walls)Roads like that are a home from home for me. :D

beuz
12th November 2007, 19:46
Roads are better now.
In 1990, roads were bad, not now.

Folkie
12th November 2007, 20:09
Roads are better now.
In 1990, roads were bad, not now.I remember on one of our trips over there there were road works in every town and village: taking advantage of grants from the EU to improve the roads.

whittlebeast
12th November 2007, 20:13
The other thing that struck me was how long it took to get somewhere. In the US you think in terms of 200 miles is 3 hrs. In the UK it ends up 5 or 6 hours. Every 10 miles you end up in some cute little town a 10 MPH.

AW

jharback
12th November 2007, 20:28
I prefer Irish drivers than french drivers....

Not Me! In the cities I would agree with you. The French and especially the Italians are much worse. Butl, on the country roads I much prefer the French Drivers to Italians, and certianly to the Irish.

Folkie
12th November 2007, 21:15
The other thing that struck me was how long it took to get somewhere. In the US you think in terms of 200 miles is 3 hrs. In the UK it ends up 5 or 6 hours. Every 10 miles you end up in some cute little town a 10 MPH.

AWYep, in the UK we generally reckon on averaging 40 mph on a trip. Maybe 50 mph if it's largely on motorways.

crashin
12th November 2007, 22:26
We had a hard time adjusting between MPH and KPH while we were there, but we didn't have a set schedule all that much so we just went where we liked. I am sorry I didn't get a chance to rent a motorcycle. Next trip we are planning on staying in one place longer. This trip was two weeks of constantly moving.

I did rent a bike, but it didn't have a motor on Inisheer.
http://farm2.static.flickr.com/1348/946015436_76d508d4f7_b.jpg (http://www.flickr.com/photos/crashin/946015436/)


I have a ton of photos here http://www.flickr.com/photos/crashin/collections/72157601036580908/

I saw a bunch of bike at Carrege-a-rede in Co. Antrim, Northern Ireland http://www.flickr.com/photos/crashin/1253765951/in/set-72157600907373099

http://farm2.static.flickr.com/1435/1465421643_cc5fc1bfde.jpg

NoBoZoS
13th November 2007, 21:50
Try this company...start and finish in Dublin
http://www.motoireland.com/

Here's another company...not far from Dublin airport
http://www.motorental.ie/

Sporting Lad
13th November 2007, 22:27
I cycled there for a month in May/June of '05. Excellent trip. Made a loop from Shannon airport. Never had a bad experience with Irish drivers in the countryside. The most dangerous were Americans trying to drive on the "wrong" side of the road in unfamiliar hired (rented) cars. :yikes:yikes Roads were crowded in touriste areas, esp The Ring of Kerry; Connemara was almost deserted by comparison. We stayed in B&Bs, had the "Full Irish Breakfast" :)
rode all day (frequent stops for photo ops, etc) then found beds in some town, checked into the pub, had pubgrub dinners (restaurants v. expensive!) explored the town, then returned to the pub around 9-10 PM for music. I'd do it all again!:wonderlan :wonderlan
Oh, sorry, can't help you with the Harley rental thing. Met a lot of Brits on sport/touring bikes.
"Slainte!"
:drinkbeer

Folkie
14th November 2007, 00:04
If you go to Kerry, obvious routes like the Ring Of Kerry aren't necessarily the best (although you should see them too). There's a tiny little road from Killarney, through the middle of MacGillycuddys's Reeks, by Glencar and on to Waterville or Derreen. It takes some finding, but boy, is it worth finding. A tiny little narrow road, with nothing for mile after mile but some of the most spectacular mountain scenery you've ever seen.

I've stayed a few times at Portmagee; a beuatiful little fishing village well away from the Ring Of Kerry road (well away from everywhere, actually!), just opposite Valencia Island.

Sláinte mhaith :drinkbeer

Sporting Lad
14th November 2007, 05:40
Cheers. :shhhh If Folkie's Road out of Killarney is the same one I think it is (and I'm not saying it is) and you happen to have given in to renting a ... car -- please do NOT take it on this road. Although it is signed against 4 wheelers (except for local residents) it seems to be taken as a suggestion more than a rule. The track is very, very narrow--it's meant to be limited to hikers, cyclists, and pony traps; anything larger than that can ruin the experience for all. On the far side of the Gap of Dunloe we got...disoriented searching for a hostel that had closed. It was a grand adventure. Ended up in a village that was not on our map. And that was just the first day of our tour! :D
Portmagee was very nice. We took a water taxi from there over to the 'island' of Skellig Michael. This is really really a 'must-see'. Park your bike for the day because you can't take your bike there--actually you wouldn't want to as it's more like the Matterhorn sticking out of the ocean, 18 miles offshore (there's a monks' colony from the dark ages on the summit). Believe it or not, you can climb to the top using the same route those monks did. There's nothing like it in North America. If you do manage it, consider yourself fortunate: Many days are too stormy for boats to put to sea. We had one perfect day there and we felt blessed.
By all means, enjoy yourself, because rural Ireland is changing very quickly due to immigration (!) and corporate globalization. :frownone

beuz
14th November 2007, 10:16
Sláinte mhaith :drinkbeer

That's the name of a Marillion's song, on the album "Clutching at straws"...

Folkie
14th November 2007, 10:28
If Folkie's Road out of Killarney is the same one I think it is (and I'm not saying it is) and you happen to have given in to renting a ... car -- please do NOT take it on this road. Although it is signed against 4 wheelers (except for local residents) it seems to be taken as a suggestion more than a rule. The track is very, very narrow--it's meant to be limited to hikers, cyclists, and pony traps; anything larger than that can ruin the experience for all. On the far side of the Gap of Dunloe …No, I didn't mean the Gap Of Dunloe road. In fact I'd seen the Gap Of Dunloe on the map and thought it looked promising, and was planning to go that way. When I got to Kate Kearney's Cottage I found that cars were banned from using it (I was in a car) so carried on around the mountain. By Lough Acoose, Bealalaw Bridge, Dromalonhurt Bridge, through the gap between Knocknagapple and Knocknacusha, and down into Ballaghisheen Forrest, Lissatinnig Bridge, and follow the River Inny down to Waterville. Or you can veer off a bit to the North, by Knockroe and Dromaragh, and come out neerer Derreen. Wonderful exploration, and much more rewarding than just tootling around the Ring Of Kerry main road (the N70).

Folkie
14th November 2007, 10:38
By all means, enjoy yourself, because rural Ireland is changing very quickly due to immigration (!) and corporate globalization. :frownoneYes, until very recently (and maybe still, just) going to Ireland was like stepping back in time. It was like England in the 1950s. It's a shame in many ways that it's changing.

Folkie
14th November 2007, 10:41
http://farm2.static.flickr.com/1435/1465421643_cc5fc1bfde.jpgcrashin, is that the Connor Pass?

Sporting Lad
14th November 2007, 21:37
Spot on, Folkie!
If a traveller really wants to do some exploring, I'd advise picking up a few of the 1:50,000 "Ordnance Survey" maps. Excellent detail and nice large scale maps. Unfortunately you can ride across one fairly quickly and we found them to be expensive if you need more than a few....
Oh, and don't forget a good compass!:wonderlan

crashin
11th October 2008, 04:48
crashin, is that the Connor Pass?

I know it's a little late, but yes it is.

Folkie
11th October 2008, 15:32
Thank you.

:D I'd almost forgotten asking the question.

Spectacular, isn't it?

http://farm2.static.flickr.com/1435/1465421643_cc5fc1bfde.jpg

crashin
16th October 2008, 01:46
It is. I can't wait to get back there again. Next time I will have a better plan and I will rent a motorcycle at least for a day. I had a rental car which was nice for exploring, but I wish I had spent more time in one spot and not as much from place to place. Looking for a B&B ate up a lot of time I could have spent in a pub or exploring.



http://www.flickr.com/photos/crashin/sets/72157600907373099/

Sporting Lad
16th October 2008, 07:29
Ditto. In 2005 we rode the south/west coasts on bicycles.
Not nearly as mobile as a car, but "closer" to the surroundings.
One place we would return to is Innisheer in the Aran Islands.
I'd like to rent a cottage there for a month and do nothing other
than pub, play music, read, explore, and generally hang out. :wonderlan

Or find a village with few tourists, and try to not act like one. :rolleyes:

beuz
16th October 2008, 08:43
Inishmore is such a nice place !!!!

http://i60.servimg.com/u/f60/11/00/68/87/p4170010.jpg

http://i60.servimg.com/u/f60/11/00/68/87/p4170011.jpg

crashin
19th October 2008, 01:23
We didn't make it to the bigger islands, but Inisheer was awesome. Next time I'd like to get a B&B on one of the islands for at least a night.

Inishmore is such a nice place !!!!

http://i60.servimg.com/u/f60/11/00/68/87/p4170010.jpg

http://i60.servimg.com/u/f60/11/00/68/87/p4170011.jpg

Folkie
19th October 2008, 01:27
We didn't make it to any of the islands, in four weeks (2 × 2), wish we had.

Edit: tell a lie, we did go on Valentia Island, but you can just drive straight on to that (from Portmagee).

Folkie
19th October 2008, 01:34
Speaking of which, I love that place:

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/c/cf/Thl_portmagee_DSCF8387.jpg

stephenw
15th April 2009, 16:44
How did I miss this one!
If any of you are coming to Kerry again bring your bikes and pm me!
I take a spin from Tralee to Dingle and over the Connor pass most weeks - I just love that road.
Folkie I see you like Portmagee - my wife is from just over that mountain in your photo, I'm often back there on the bike too.
You should have a look at the HOG rally in Killarney in June, it's a great weekend and they have big ride outs around the ring and Dingle

I'm from near here
http://image36.webshots.com/37/4/63/57/292146357buhSXV_ph.jpg

Folkie
15th April 2009, 16:56
I love the Dingle peninsular too (especially the Connor Pass). I spent quite a bit of time one holiday tracing the route of the old railway (I'm into narrow gauge railways). My wife did complain when I left her parked outside the undertakers in Dingle while I explored: it's in the old station building!

stephenw
15th April 2009, 17:00
I love the Dingle peninsular too (especially the Connor Pass). I spent quite a bit of time one holiday tracing the route of the old railway (I'm into narrow gauge railways). My wife did complain when I left her parked outside the undertakers in Dingle while I explored: it's in the old station building!
We were up the Connor Pass with about 30 or 40 Harleys of all varieties on a rideout last summer, most of them had open pipes and the sound bouncing off the rock walls and echoing was incredible, I have never heard anything like it

Sporting Lad
16th April 2009, 21:07
I love the Dingle peninsular too (especially the Connor Pass). I spent quite a bit of time one holiday tracing the route of the old railway (I'm into narrow gauge railways). My wife did complain when I left her parked outside the undertakers in Dingle while I explored: it's in the old station building!

Dingle's got 1500 inhabitants and 57 pubs, but you park the wife at the undertakers??! Not too subtle, Nigel.
What'd you say, "Wait for me here , my cupcake, at this quaint little funeral parlour. I may be gone for some time."?
I take it she was still there when you returned "quite a bit of time " later.
An all-day tour of an undertaker's establishment kept her out of mischief, did it? Would'nt want her venturing into one of those 57 nasty pubs for a bit of lunch now, would you? :chtwo:frownthre:D
I must say, I have newfound respect for the way you Brits are able to handle your wives! :wonderlan
Complain? I'll bet she did! :wifemad

Folkie
16th April 2009, 23:08
Then we went into Dingle, to one of those 57 pubs, and had a nice lunch.

Sporting Lad
19th April 2009, 05:58
"I'm just going outside and may be some time." :frownthre
(final words of Capt. L. E. Oates to Robert Falcon Scott,
R. N. expedition tent, Antarctica, 1911)
:cry1