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-   Sportster Motorcycle Transmission, Clutch, Primary & Secondary Drive (http://xlforum.net/forums/forumdisplay.php?f=35)
-   -   Rigid_EVO Clutch squeal ? Bad throwout bearing ? (http://xlforum.net/forums/showthread.php?t=1688139)

60Gunner 6th September 2019 19:54

I said IF you do a conversion. As in 883/1200.

boomerguy 6th September 2019 21:14

Quote:

Originally Posted by 60Gunner (Post 5775300)
I said IF you do a conversion. As in 883/1200.

OOPS! Ok. :doh

boomerguy 16th September 2019 00:52

OOPS. I duplicated a post and had to delete it. My bad.

boomerguy 10th November 2019 01:00

I replaced the throw out bearing in accordance with all of the above directions and pictures. I love it! The clutch lever is easier and smoother. I've put about 2K miles on the new bearing with no problems at all. After I installed it, I wrote up my own version and maybe the following will help someone.

Sportster Clutch Throw Out Bearing Replacement

This can be done now or at any time the clutch ramp assembly has been removed.

With motorcycle sitting level on the Jack:
1. Raise the motorcycle on the jack. (If the primary oil has not been drained, it will spill out unless the bike is level.)
2. Remove the two clamps that hold the clutch cable to the frame. Remove the zip-ties and slide off the boot. Loosen the clutch cable all the way.


Remove the DERBY COVER:
1. Loosen the Derby Cover screws head bit in a “Star-Pattern”. Hold the Derby Cover in place while removing the last screw so the spring holding the clutch adjuster locknut doesn’t fly out.
2. Remove the clutch adjuster locknut. With a thin shaft, flat blade screwdriver, turn the clutch adjuster screw CW until you can manually unscrew the locknut and remove it from the screwdriver shaft.
3. Remove the ramp assembly from the clutch cable end and do not let loose of the clutch cable end until you have removed it from the clutch cable or it will fall into the primary and disappear. Leave the clutch cable attached to the primary cover.


Replace the THROW OUT BEARING:
1. Remove the snap ring which holds the release plate (holder/retainer) in place.
2. Remove the release plate.
3. Remove the retaining ring/circlip which holds the threaded adjuster screw in place in the release plate.
4. Remove the stock radial throw out bearing from the release plate by PRESSING it out. (See notes below.)
5. The new FAG 7200B angular throw out bearing goes into the release plate with the wide-OUTER race going in first. The threaded adjuster screw goes in with the mushroom end on the back side of where you push the bearing into. This makes the base/mushroom end with a lip to be in contact with the wide-INNER race. The bearing must be PRESS-FIT into position inside the release plate. (See notes below.)

Once the adjuster screw is inserted through the bearing with the threads facing out of the other side of the release plate, install the small retaining/circlip that holds the adjuster screw in place.

The wide-outer and the narrow-inner races are on the same side. (This is the numbers side.)*
The narrow-outer and the wide-inner are on the same side.

Note:
• To PRESS OUT the old throw out bearing from the release plate, you will need an 18mm socket and a 32mm socket with two small boards and a bench vice.
• To PRESS IN the new bearing into the release plate you will need only the 32mm socket and two small boards with a bench vice. Be careful not to press too far. You can tap the final distance with a soft hammer and the 32mm socket.

*There are numbers on the stock bearing outer race which are on the opposite side from the new bearing. Disregard these numbers because they will confuse you.

vtwinlynne 23rd August 2020 20:03

Sorry to reopen this old thread but some of the pics are missing and I dunno, :confused: some of the information seems to be conflicting.
I don't need to know how the bearing presses into the plate, but which way round does the bearing sit over the adjusting screw, Version A or Version B?

Thanks for your help?

Version A - wide inner race / narrow outer race towards transmission
https://drive.google.com/file/d/1PtF...ew?usp=sharing


Version B - narrow inner race / wide outer race towards transmission
https://drive.google.com/file/d/1L0A...ew?usp=sharing

boomerguy 23rd August 2020 20:18

Quote:

Originally Posted by vtwinlynne (Post 5844358)
Sorry to reopen this old thread but some of the pics are missing and I dunno, :confused: some of the information seems to be conflicting.
I don't need to know how the bearing presses into the plate, but which way round does the bearing sit over the adjusting screw, Version A or Version B?

Thanks for your help?

Version A - wide inner race / narrow outer race towards transmission
https://drive.google.com/file/d/1PtF...ew?usp=sharing


Version B - narrow inner race / wide outer race towards transmission
https://drive.google.com/file/d/1L0A...ew?usp=sharing

Replace the THROW OUT BEARING:
1. Remove the snap ring which holds the release plate (holder/retainer) in place.
2. Remove the release plate.
3. Remove the retaining ring/circlip which holds the threaded adjuster screw in place in the release plate.
4. Remove the stock radial throw out bearing from the release plate by PRESSING it out. (See notes below.)
5. The new FAG 7200B angular throw out bearing goes into the release plate with the wide-OUTER race going in first. The threaded adjuster screw goes in with the mushroom end on the back side of where you push the bearing into. This makes the base/mushroom end with a lip to be in contact with the wide-INNER race. The bearing must be PRESS-FIT into position inside the release plate. (See notes below.)

Once the clutch adjuster screw is inserted through the bearing with the threads facing out of the other side of the release plate, install the small retaining/circlip that holds the adjuster screw in place.

The wide-outer and the narrow-inner races are on the same side. (This is the numbers side.)*
The narrow-outer and the wide-inner are on the same side.

Choose
*There are numbers on the stock bearing outer race which are on the opposite side from the new bearing. Disregard these numbers because they will confuse you.

Choose Picture A. Compare the pictures. See which INNER race is WIDER.

wedge 23rd August 2020 21:05

Quote:

Originally Posted by vtwinlynne (Post 5844358)
Sorry to reopen this old thread but some of the pics are missing and I dunno, :confused: some of the information seems to be conflicting.
I don't need to know how the bearing presses into the plate, but which way round does the bearing sit over the adjusting screw, Version A or Version B?

Thanks for your help?

Version A - wide inner race / narrow outer race towards transmission
https://drive.google.com/file/d/1PtF...ew?usp=sharing


Version B - narrow inner race / wide outer race towards transmission
https://drive.google.com/file/d/1L0A...ew?usp=sharing

Version A is correct. You can remember this easily if you just observe what the action of pulling on that adjusting screw will do. (Pretend there are no balls in it if that helps).

You want the INNER RACE to resist pulling all the way through the outer race as you pull on the adjusting screw. So, the wide side of the inner race will jam in there like a cork in a wine bottle. The wide side of the outer race is away from you in picture A, and if you picture that, the wide side of the inner race will be jamming against the wide side of the outer race to keep it from pulling through.



If you look at version B, you see that the narrow side of the inner race would be pulling towards the narrow side of the outer race. It would just pull right through.



The balls in the bearing are just the friction zone, and if you visualize it, in Version A, the wide inner race will be pushing those balls towards the wide side of the outer race. That allows the friction ring that the bearings form where the balls make contact to be more towards center of the race groove.



To see why people consider this better than a standard bearing, you can visualize a standard bearing where both sides are the same. As you apply pressure to the adjusting screw by pulling it from the threaded end, the friction ring would be closer to the outside edge of both races. Honestly it probably makes no difference where that ring is because as the balls or races wear the bearing is trash anyway. I run a tapered throwout bearing, but in my mind the jury is still out as to weather it makes any difference at all. So, since I see no instance where it would be a bad thing, I figure I will err on the side of tapered races.



You could also visualize a tapered neck bearing viewed from the same position as A and B above. You install the top outer neck bearing race with the narrow end of the race facing you. If you pressed it in the other way you would not be able to place the bearing and inner race into it. So as you put that inner race in and tighten the neck bolt you are squeezing the races together and you can set a tension. If it was flipped over (impossible because the inner race would fall into the abys), you wouldn't be able to get the neck bearings to work at all.

IXL2Relax 23rd August 2020 22:34

Here's the Sportstepedia section on the Clutch - With Pics:
http://sportsterpedia.com/doku.php/t...vo:priclutch01

And the REFerence section with the upgraded bearing:
http://sportsterpedia.com/doku.php/t...r_ball_bearing


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Nibelungen 24th August 2020 01:00

according to SKF site... radial bearing 6200 (equivalent HD p/n 8885) since deep grooved... can stand even assial/angular forces...

that said i already have on a shelf in my garage an SKF 7200B... 10 euros... for the next time i will be servicing the clutch...

boomerguy 24th August 2020 01:12

Here is a brief description of the 7200B bearing and how it works:

"A lot of people change the stock bearing for a FAG 7200B angular contact bearing. It is designed for the type of load in the Harley clutch. Note that it must be installed correctly so bearing surface is oriented correctly to take the load.

The clutch adjuster screw pulls outward. You can see if you look at the bearing closely each side is different.

The correct description is 7200B angular contact bearing. It is not a thrust bearing. However, it does increase the thrust strength significantly over the stock radial ball bearing.

The throw out bearing pulls outward when you pull the lever. You are pulling the adjusting screw towards the derby cover (outside) and that is pulling the pressure plate away from the plates."

I've had mine in place along with my 3 replacement stock clutch plates that replaced the "grenade" spring plate for almost two years now. The 7200B bearing has made the clutch lever pull lighter and smoother than it was with the original stock bearing which only had 9K miles on it at the time.
I've put 10K miles on the new bearing and the clutch lever pull improvement is still just as good as the first time I rode the bike with it. I would definitely recommend it to anyone. Small price for vast improvement and peace of mind.


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