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-   -   Ironhead $ cost to have bike assembled? (http://xlforum.net/forums/showthread.php?t=2075854)

Gold Member 13th February 2020 03:18

$ cost to have bike assembled?
 
I have half a mind to ask my indie mechanic to put my bike back together for me once the engine machining is done. I just don't have any energy this time of the year lol. :frownthre

It's a roller but it's totally in pieces.

What I'm wondering is a guesstimate of how much this would run me. You could also PM me if you indie guys don't want to talk money publicly.

I'd like to just have it put together so I can get on it and ride it. It's been apart for 1-1/2 years now.

IronMick 13th February 2020 03:49

My own experience, along with the experience of at least a few members here, is that once the bike is on the table at the indie's, it is in the area of $100 per hour and he feels responsible to do the best he can. This usually takes a lot of hours. The hours accumulate quickly. He cannot rush the job just as as you and I cannot rush it, as things will be overlooked etc.

SHAKY DAVE 13th February 2020 05:39

where you located?no problem for me to do it,completely but I live in the mountains in central cal

Ferrous Head 13th February 2020 11:46

I would be very surprised if it's cost effective.

I work on my own bike for 50 cents an hour. Otherwise the price I had to ask for when I do eventually decide to sell the bike is astronomical.

To be cost effective it has to be a labor of love. Otherwise, just go buy a complete bike.

Ferrous Head 13th February 2020 11:47

Or give the job to Shakey Dave - he has enough time on his hands now. :)

bustert 13th February 2020 13:58

hd goes by a flat rate book like auto dealers so give them a call. where you get into trouble is electrical, an open book until found and fixed. you can find older hd flat rate books on the net but the protect the new ones. here, over 100 an hour!!!!

sleighcrane 13th February 2020 14:34

I would say don't do it. Sounds like you are a little bit discouraged but you took it apart you can put it back together. It will be a lot more rewarding in the end. Pay to have the motor/trans done but if you have it where it's a roller there's not much left to do. One step at a time. Good luck

Iron Mike 13th February 2020 15:43

Quote:

Originally Posted by Ferrous Head (Post 5805866)
Or give the job to Shakey Dave - he has enough time on his hands now. :)

He could probably do it standing on one foot!

Any Indie worth his salt building a complete bike will require replacing anything out of service wear limits. I have "built more than my share of customers Ironheads in the same scenario you are in now and it far exceeds the price of buying a complete decent runner. And you are no closer to knowing your machine. Be prepared to spend twice its value, after you have all your machine and eng work done. Proper build is from bare frame on straightening jig (Yes its out of spec) to complete running machine ready to ride with his/her name backing it. Far cry from assembling it yourself and allowing some things o be "good enough".

RicThompson 13th February 2020 15:59

When it comes to having a shop do anything it is entirely up to the shop. What level of quality are you going for? Is this build for show, racing or daily rider? If basic daily rider let it sit until you get reenergized to do it yourself.

Tim The Grim 13th February 2020 17:07

There’s no substitute for having an intimate knowledge of every aspect of your scoot.

Assembling and fitting every component, brings with it that “sixth sense” of anything out of the ordinary and hopefully how to fix it before it really goes wrong.

Other guys built my lower ends because I didn’t have the correct tools, but that’s it.

I’ve always done my own tear downs, top ends and full assembly since I was 17. The 3 times my Ironhead left me stranded during the 31 years I owned it were a broken point cam screw, a dissolved primary drive belt and a broken rear chain that wouldn’t accept the master link I always carry on my key ring. There were dozens of successful roadside fixes because I knew every nut, bolt, wire and bracket and carried the right tools.

Just having an Ironhead titled in your name doesn’t mean you “OWN” it.


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