Thread: Lane Splitting?
View Single Post
  #141  
Old 5th September 2013
sportsterdoc's Avatar
sportsterdoc sportsterdoc is offline
Senior Master Custom Bike Builder
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Mojave Desert
Posts: 13,415
Reputation: 5789842
sportsterdoc has a reputation beyond reputesportsterdoc has a reputation beyond reputesportsterdoc has a reputation beyond reputesportsterdoc has a reputation beyond reputesportsterdoc has a reputation beyond reputesportsterdoc has a reputation beyond reputesportsterdoc has a reputation beyond reputesportsterdoc has a reputation beyond reputesportsterdoc has a reputation beyond reputesportsterdoc has a reputation beyond reputesportsterdoc has a reputation beyond repute
Default

From the California Driver's Handbook
I have probably posted this before

Lane Splitting

The term lane splitting, sometimes known as lane sharing, filtering, or white-lining refers to the process of a motorcyclist riding between lanes of stopped or slower-moving traffic or moving between lanes to the front of traffic stopped at a traffic light.
Lane splitting should not be performed by inexperienced riders. When choosing to lane split, skilled motorcycle riders should consider the following:

Traffic flow – Travel at a speed that is no more than 10 mph faster than other traffic; danger increases at higher speed differentials. Lane splitting is not advised when traffic flow is at 30 mph or faster; danger increases as overall speed increases.
Traffic lanes – Lane splitting is encouraged to be done between the #1 and #2 lanes; typically, it is safer to lane split in these lanes than between other lanes.
Environment – The total environment should be considered, including the width of the lanes, size of surrounding vehicles, the roadway, weather, and lighting conditions.
Hazards – Riders should anticipate possible movements by other road users and be alert at all times.

NOTE:These general guidelines assume a high level of riding competency and experience and do not guarantee to keep you safe. Every rider has the ultimate responsibility for his or her own decision making and safety. Riders must be conscious of reducing crash risk at all times.

http://www.dmv.ca.gov/pubs/dl655/mcy.../abilities.htm
Reply With Quote