Thread: Ironhead Special tools
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Old 1st January 2009
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Default Piston pin bushing install and ream

Used a 9/16 UNF high tensile bolt with stepped collars turned to fit loosely in the new bush, and slightly smaller than the outside diameter and pulled the old bushes out and the new ones in. Make sure the chamfered end of the bush goes in first.





After pulling the bushings in with the above rig, this is my $1 holding jig to stop the connecting rods flopping about when I reamed them. A couple bits of timber and four bolts. Holds them nice an steady for reaming.



And two holes in a rag with some tape stops any bronze chips from the reamer getting down in the crankcase.



Used an adjustable hand reamer to carefully size the bushings. The pins slide in and out without a hitch and just barely perceptible shake. Dont want them tight or they might nip up in operation. I have heard of guys putting fine grinding paste on an old pin to lap out the last half-a-thousandth, but I dont like putting paste in my engine if I can avoid it. Those little bits of carborundum might just embed in the bronze. So brake hone it was:



Then checked the pin was parallel to the crankcase mouth by using two pieces of 3/4" precision key steel from my local bearing supply shop. [/QUOTE]
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