Thread: Ironhead Special tools
View Single Post
  #16  
Old 1st January 2009
Hopper's Avatar
Hopper Hopper is offline
Senior Master Custom Bike Builder
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Australia
Posts: 9,371
Reputation: 256674
Hopper has a brilliant futureHopper has a brilliant futureHopper has a brilliant futureHopper has a brilliant futureHopper has a brilliant futureHopper has a brilliant futureHopper has a brilliant futureHopper has a brilliant futureHopper has a brilliant futureHopper has a brilliant futureHopper has a brilliant future
Default Cylinder head torque wrench - in frame

Pic: 1/2" drive torque wrench for 60 ft lbs, shown here on rear head, using universal joint and 3/8 drive socket to access head bolt. More about that little game later.



This one I bought ages ago. A 3/8 drive universal joint. It needs to be a good quality one so it is slim enough to fit the very tight space, and to take the 60ft lbs torque required on the head bolts. This is hooked to a very slim 3/8 drive 7/16AF socket, a 4-inch extension and a 3/8 to half-inch adaptor to hook it to my bigger torque wrench.

Pic: Head bolt torquing rig:



Pic, if universal joint is too fat, it might need grinding down a little bit, but mine was ok.




Pic: Universal joint in action. This is the toughest one to do, the front right stud on the rear cylinder.




Pic: Small torque wrench for initial tighten to 20, then 40 ft lbs. Dont hold your torque wrench like this if you are really using it. Hold by the proper handle bit, without thumb extended. It can affect the torque reading.


Pic: Big torque wrench for final tighten to 60ft lbs. The purists will argue that the torque reading could be put off by the angle of the universal joint etc. I tried it on the easy to get to head bolts, tightening straight and tightening crooked, and then seeing how much torque was required to loosen the bolt, and I could see no noticeable difference on a wrench like this with a dial rather than click. I am happy they are as near as dammit.



All this can take some jiggling. The universal joint works in some positions, but not others, so you have to take it off and turn it around a little. Also make sure the socket is all the way down on the bolt head before putting 60 ft lb on it. My best advice is to use top quality brand tools, they are slimmer and made of stronger steel and fit better. My favourites, but I cant always afford them are Stahlwille, German made. Thin, light, but strong.
__________________
In theory there is no difference between theory and practice. In practice there is.
Reply With Quote