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Old 14th February 2020
ryder rick's Avatar
ryder rick ryder rick is offline
Senior Master Custom Bike Builder
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Cornelius, OR
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You will pay dearly to have someone assemble your bike. It is best done yourself. And you have to take your time, remembering that every shortcut you take will come back and bite you on the ass. Most of what you need to know is in the wiki, the rest is common sense and there is only one way to learn that. DIVE IN! Financially this is the only responsible path.

I will do it for $50 hr but you have to do it "my way", and on MY schedule. There are things I won't do, and parts I won't use for a reason, that is what you are paying me for. In the end you spend money until it is done, even if you do it yourself, you will make many trips to your parts guy or wait for the brown truck. I can't look at a pile of parts and say it's going to cost this much. And even if I did there are always setbacks. The target changes, stuff doesn't fit or play nice. 30-50 years of hackery and abuse by previous owners or folks calling themselves mechanics it is impossible to predict what it will take to erase that. If you have the disposable income and no desire to smash your fingers feel free to contact me.

Another thing to address is, do you just want the motor installed so it just runs (Cheap)? Any hack can slap a motor in.
Or do you expect it to be turn key and ready to ride, and last?

Installing a motor is simple and quick, it's all the little details that are difficult and take time. And this is what makes the difference when you point it down the road. To do that you have to scrape off all the Do Do and un-fornicate everything you touch. For example, I have a whole drawer in one of my tool boxes that has nothing but thread repair stuff in it because of the things previous owners have "repaired". Cleaning the silicone out of the blind bolt holes, replacing missing dowel pins, using correct and quality hardware is important for the best finished product. Stopping when things go wrong and back tracking to correct them before moving forward is the only way to accomplish this. You have to ignore the clock and sometimes the calendar to make this happen.
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Ryder Rick "I know right from wrong, but sometimes, wrong feels right"
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