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Old 17th September 2007
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It would be interesting to know what the setup is on the UK and European 1200N too, as they are higher; I'm assuming both front and back??!! Which fork spring are they using I wonder? Have they left out the preload spacer?
Harley doesn't tell us how any bikes are set up. If you want to improve your suspension, it will be trial and error like every one else. Understanding what I have been describing in this and my other suspension threads will be a good start. I will keep everyone posted about the progress we make with Road Chicks Nightster. The next question I ask people who want to improve their suspension is ... how much work do you want to do? If you describe how your bike rides, I will try to explain why it rides that way and what you can do to improve it. I am off work for the next week because of surgery, so I have nothing better to do than sit here and type.

If you want to measure suspension sag of the forks and shocks and post the results, maybe someone else will do the same for a US bike.

Jack the bike up so both tires are off the ground. For the rear, measure the vertical distance up from the axle to some point on the chrome side piece on the fender. For the front, pick one point on the upper fork tube (EDIT: like the top of the cap) and another on the lower fork tube. Using a piece of tape to mark the points is the easiest way.

Lower the bike to the ground, have some one hold the bike up vertical, off the kick stand. Measure the same points and subtract the short measurement from the long one. That is how much the bike's weight compresses the springs. That is called bike sag or unloaded (no rider) sag. (EDIT: If you sit gently on the bike the forks may not compress at all, you may have to bounce the forks to get them to compress, just be consistent. Push them down and let them slowly come up, use that point to measure. There is so much internal friction (stiction) in these forks it is hard to get them to stop at the same point everytime.

Since the bikes are all the same weight, if the bike sag measurements are different, the springs will also be different. Well, not quite. The length of the preload spacer can affect bike sag, so everyone will need to set the shock sag to the lowest setting before taking the measurements. If two different bikes have the same preload spacer and the same spring, the bike sag measurements will be the same.
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Former Ricor test rider for IAS Shocks, Intiminators and Vibranators. Works Dual Rate fork springs, fork brace, Avon Venom X tires, loosen drive belt, and set frame rails level to floor. See "7 Pages of Suspension" thread in the Suspension Sticky Index. It's official, I am now in the "I've forgotten more than I remember club."

Last edited by XLXR; 18th September 2007 at 05:03..
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