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  #31  
Old 14th September 2018
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Luckily I grew up with a couple of brothers who, like I, were competitive. Not in an "in your face" sort of way but we'd try to push each other past what we thought were our limits. Since we rode together that transferred to our riding prowess as well. We'd have closed course competitions of who could stop the quickest, ride a section of road the fastest and stuff like that. Practice makes perfect. We were then turned on to Keith Code's book 'Twist of a Wrist' which taught us practical applications that not only work on the race track but on the street as well. We applied those lessons learned to our bike handling practices. We rode in various groups of hooligans and got in situations in which, over the years, riding buddies have died because of their lack of preparedness which was surpassed by their testosterone levels yet my brothers and I have survived. Riding a motorcycle isn't just a recreational activity, it's a discipline in which preparation and training helps increase your odds of surviving difficult situations that are thrown in your path. Forty years later we are still alive and riding without incident... without ever having crashed on public roads or even 'dropped' a bike.

With that said it's in your best interest to approach riding a motorcycle with you on your 'A' game... with your tools, your motorcycle, being at it's peak efficiency. A motorcycle will stop best using the front brake, that's a fact. Conditioning yourself to use it well as your primary instinct instead of relying on making a decision and responding, which causes precious seconds to lapse, is a game changer. Sure motorcycle styles and trends tend to dictate what sort of handicap you will be left to deal with but if you want to increase your odds of surviving the game, choose a good set of tools that you have trained to use.

Rant off.
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  #32  
Old 14th September 2018
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Luckily I grew up with a couple of brothers who, like I, were competitive. Not in an "in your face" sort of way but we'd try to push each other past what we thought were our limits. Since we rode together that transferred to our riding prowess as well. We'd have closed course competitions of who could stop the quickest, ride a section of road the fastest and stuff like that. Practice makes perfect. We were then turned on to Keith Code's book 'Twist of a Wrist' which taught us practical applications that not only work on the race track but on the street as well. We applied those lessons learned to our bike handling practices. We rode in various groups of hooligans and got in situations in which, over the years, riding buddies have died because of their lack of preparedness which was surpassed by their testosterone levels yet my brothers and I have survived. Riding a motorcycle isn't just a recreational activity, it's a discipline in which preparation and training helps increase your odds of surviving difficult situations that are thrown in your path. Forty years later we are still alive and riding without incident... without ever having crashed on public roads or even 'dropped' a bike.

With that said it's in your best interest to approach riding a motorcycle with you on your 'A' game... with your tools, your motorcycle, being at it's peak efficiency. A motorcycle will stop best using the front brake, that's a fact. Conditioning yourself to use it well as your primary instinct instead of relying on making a decision and responding, which causes precious seconds to lapse, is a game changer. Sure motorcycle styles and trends tend to dictate what sort of handicap you will be left to deal with but if you want to increase your odds of surviving the game, choose a good set of tools that you have trained to use.

Rant off.
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  #33  
Old 14th September 2018
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wedge View Post
Honestly, in a real panic situation, that isn't going to happen. Everyone really needs to take the time to learn how to lock up both brakes and bring it to a complete stop without crashing from at least 30 MPH. You are never going to downshift three times in fast succession while the bumper in front of you is getting closer by the second.

In the military, the government owns your body, you are essentially government property. Back in 69 while in Okinawa we had to be able to do just that to get a license. It was part of the test that included some other really hairball things. Looking back, I'm probably alive today because they forced me to learn things that most of the time you will never use. Locking the brakes is never recommended, but the ability to do it is as important as breathing in my book.
Actually where I grew up we had to do similar stuff in a car as part of our driver's ed class. Lock it up and spin it around in a parking lot. Fun stuff. lol
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  #34  
Old 15th November 2018
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This is a great and useful thread! Unfortunately, everyone can face such a problem. It is not a joke, your life is in danger...Also I think it is hard not to panic at this moment
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  #35  
Old 15th November 2018
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Diogenes415 View Post
Luckily I grew up with a couple of brothers who, like I, were competitive. Not in an "in your face" sort of way but we'd try to push each other past what we thought were our limits. Since we rode together that transferred to our riding prowess as well. We'd have closed course competitions of who could stop the quickest, ride a section of road the fastest and stuff like that. Practice makes perfect. We were then turned on to Keith Code's book 'Twist of a Wrist' which taught us practical applications that not only work on the race track but on the street as well. We applied those lessons learned to our bike handling practices. We rode in various groups of hooligans and got in situations in which, over the years, riding buddies have died because of their lack of preparedness which was surpassed by their testosterone levels yet my brothers and I have survived. Riding a motorcycle isn't just a recreational activity, it's a discipline in which preparation and training helps increase your odds of surviving difficult situations that are thrown in your path. Forty years later we are still alive and riding without incident... without ever having crashed on public roads or even 'dropped' a bike.

With that said it's in your best interest to approach riding a motorcycle with you on your 'A' game... with your tools, your motorcycle, being at it's peak efficiency. A motorcycle will stop best using the front brake, that's a fact. Conditioning yourself to use it well as your primary instinct instead of relying on making a decision and responding, which causes precious seconds to lapse, is a game changer. Sure motorcycle styles and trends tend to dictate what sort of handicap you will be left to deal with but if you want to increase your odds of surviving the game, choose a good set of tools that you have trained to use.

Rant off.
Extremely well stated!!!
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