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hero
5th September 2011, 20:35
Okay, I don't log in here that often no more (sold the bike 4 years ago and missing it) but glad to see the tension procedure still helps a few people, and applies even to the newer bikes.

Be safe.
Stef

Ironboy883
5th May 2012, 15:15
Ok I've been struggling with this for awhile trying to get it right ... Hero thank you 5 minutes with an Allan key and a 7/8s just made my bike shift like brand new !! I've adjusted it so many time to either have a clunk hard as hell or have it whine loud as hell !! This was awesome !!

marine_hm
16th September 2012, 23:42
Yes, with the back tire lifted and the engine running, tighten the tensioner until you hear a whining noise, then back it off until the whining goes away, maybe 1/8th turn more. Tighten the nut and your good to go!

805HD
5th December 2012, 19:21
By 'loading up' I mean slowly increase the preload on the tensioner. No need to have the rear wheel turning or even on a lift. Only the engine running, as the whine is audible with the bike standing still. Might be an even clearer whine if you GENTLY twist the throttle between each turn of the adjuster. Take it for a testdrive after, & take the 2 adjusting wrenches with you, coz if you got it wrong, it's only a matter of slackening the locknut & making a fine tuning. Saved me a lot of time in the past.

I know this post is a bit old but i just wanted to share how well this method worked for me. Took me all of 15 mins. With the bike hot and running and primary chain under to much tension you can clearly hear the "whine" give it gas and you can really hear it. Anyways backed of the tension untill the sound was gone locked it all down and wah lah! My bike has never shifted so solid and smoothly.

Thanks!

xena
5th December 2012, 19:25
An oldie but def a goodie! Stefs method is the only way I've ever done this adjustment!


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ka07tar
19th July 2013, 23:44
After reading all the pages, back in 2005 these didn't exist. Now that they do, has anyone tried them? If so, any feedback? In theory, this will eliminate the packing tape, listening for the whine, hot/cold, 5 tire spins in 5th gear...

http://www.haydensm6.com/m6_xl5.htm

wedge
19th July 2013, 23:54
I think Lux tried it with less than good results.

I adjust mine running too, but just in neutral with the wheel on the ground.

xena
20th July 2013, 00:47
I wouldn't buy that gadget. Adjusting the chain is not difficult.


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sportysrock
20th July 2013, 19:58
After reading all the pages, back in 2005 these didn't exist. Now that they do, has anyone tried them? If so, any feedback? In theory, this will eliminate the packing tape, listening for the whine, hot/cold, 5 tire spins in 5th gear...

http://www.haydensm6.com/m6_xl5.htm

No, do not use it. Either Hammer Performance or NRHS can tell the horror story. I believe it is in the tech section on one of their websites, & has been mentioned on this forum.

Sent with :-)

ka07tar
21st July 2013, 11:30
Bike started jerking around & could hear the chain, put it into spec 3/8-1/2 cold, rechecked it after it was hot, & still get the bike jerking mid-band with steady throttle once its warmed up. Starting to think its something else, maybe the cam tensioner is bad, weak clutch spring, don't know at this moment. Could be fuel filter, just did a rebuild on the carb & cleaned all the gunk out.

benton
21st July 2013, 12:06
After reading all the pages, back in 2005 these didn't exist. Now that they do, has anyone tried them? If so, any feedback? In theory, this will eliminate the packing tape, listening for the whine, hot/cold, 5 tire spins in 5th gear...

http://www.haydensm6.com/m6_xl5.htm

This made my chain oscillate up and down and hit the casing. I went back to the stock adjustment and have been fine ever since. And if my chain was tighter in one spot than another I would replace it.

tdog
22nd July 2013, 14:26
fitted an m-6 tensioner 5/6 years ago... gear change easier, less 'jerkyness' on/off throttle, improved wear on primary - stays in correct tension much longer than stock item.
no problems.

Mc7
28th July 2013, 17:48
I would like to add my two cents to this discussion. I'm speaking on the factory cold adjustment here. Every video and reading I've seen on the subject states to adjust at the tightest spot and while I agree with this, what I don't agree with is that there saying a half inch at tightest. That's going to leave the rest of the chain very loose. I say adjust it to 3/8 the minimum setting at the tightest spot so the rest of the chain would hopefully be at the loosest setting of 1/2

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stocker883l
29th July 2013, 03:07
The cold spec is 3/8 to 1/2 cold. And 1/4 to 3/8 hot. The manual also states that you should re-adjust to factory specs if at your tight spot is less than a 1/4. So go figure. I check mine at every oil change..3/8 to 1/2 cold is fine. I recheck after a nice ride and if it is 1/4 to 3/8 hot. I leave it alone. They are primitive lawn mower engines...Close enough is good enough.

semjpm
29th July 2013, 04:50
The chain will tighten more than you think when it gets hot. I've been using 1/2" cold at tight spot and all is well. There is another method where you adjust HOT with engine running for a whine then back off 1/4 turn. Tried it and it seems OK but winds up at 1/2" when it cools down. So, who knows. Better a little loose than a little tight. Too tight and you will loose the bearing at the crank or clutch side.

SEMJPM

Mc7
29th July 2013, 18:12
I adjusted mine yesterday while changing plugs and oil. While jacked up and plugs out, I had my wife turn the back wheel while looked for the tightest spot. Strangely though, mine is about the same all the way around. So adjusting it was very easy. 1/2 and go. I hope it remains that way for the life of the bike :-) no tight spot to worry about.

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r4fthrs
29th July 2013, 23:29
There is another method where you adjust HOT with engine running for a whine then back off 1/4 turn. Tried it and it seems OK but winds up at 1/2" when it cools down. So, who knows. Better a little loose than a little tight. Too tight and you will loose the bearing at the crank or clutch side.

SEMJPM

+1 on that method. Have been doing that for the last three years and it has been perfectly adjusted every time.

sportstertom
14th September 2013, 10:23
Thanks for the tip will try it this morning with the plate on if I can't hear the whine i'll pull the plate...

wedge
14th September 2013, 18:31
Thanks for the tip will try it this morning with the plate on if I can't hear the whine i'll pull the plate...

Oh, you can hear it. Just make sure you adjust when bike is really hot, and as you ride, keep listening for a whine. If it whines while riding, you will need to back it off slightly further (like 1/8 turn or so).

sportstertom
15th September 2013, 04:41
Adjusted my primary chain today after a good warm up with it running worked like a charm .Thanks for all the good info on this one.:clap

chasgrips45
9th November 2013, 15:02
If you use the factory method. Why not bump the engine start button . That will rotate the engine slightly on each "bump" . It only needs to be done a few times. As mc7 writes that these are pretty basic engines. If one decides to use the method with the engine running,why not drain about half the tranny fluid out,do the sound adjustment .
You're not going to be operating the engine for too long. It would seem that the mess made would be a little less. No?

Bone
9th November 2013, 15:09
If you use the factory method. Why not bump the engine start button . That will rotate the engine slightly on each "bump" . It only needs to be done a few times. As mc7 writes that these are pretty basic engines. If one decides to use the method with the engine running,why not drain about half the tranny fluid out,do the sound adjustment .
You're not going to be operating the engine for too long. It would seem that the mess made would be a little less. No?

Bumping like that spins it too far, too fast. You won't be able to really tell if you've found the tight spot.

That said, it's probably fine as I never note THAT big a difference in slack from one point to another.

Still, using a rear wheel roller and slowly spinning and checking is so easy I've never bothered looking for another way to spin the chain.

chasgrips45
9th November 2013, 15:27
go around a few times, you'll feel the tight spot if there is one . Make a mark on the chain with chalk, or white out, pass the mark twice maybe & I think there`s a good chance you`ve passed ,& felt it.

tdog
12th April 2014, 10:16
a bit late but hey,

instead of all this looking for tight spots etc....

http://www.haydensm6.com/m6_xl4.htm

tdog

sportysrock
12th April 2014, 15:42
a bit late but hey,

instead of all this looking for tight spots etc....

http://www.haydensm6.com/m6_xl4.htm

tdog

They've been mentioned as a grenade point on NRHS' or Hammer's website. I'm not saying they're good or bad from personal experience, but passing along info.

-- Sent with :-)