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diverguy
26th July 2005, 22:24
Ok, I dont know what to do. I want a sportster but i want it chopped. Ive seen a few now that have been modified by the down tube 8", backbone 6", 43 degree rake and 16 over fork tubes. Everthing els stock.

Now my problem is Ive never worked on a bike before. Taking it apart.


Would it be too expensive to let a shop take it apart for me? While its apart Ill get a buddy of mine to paint it , then get the shop to put it back together.

Ive called around but cant get a good answer.


thanks

choppediron
26th July 2005, 23:35
invest $50 dollars in a service manual...get some sort of bike lift (PEP-BOYS for $50) and go slow and TAKE YOUR TIME. In my opinion there is no better way to learn. Lucky for us sportsters are pretty easy to work with. Plus...you will take better care of your ride because its yours rather than some shop. If you have all the tools the tear down should be pretty easy. Tools included basic wrenches...socket set...some allen wrenches...torque wrench...nothing to fancy. :banana TAKE LOTS OF PICTURES AND KEEP YOUR PARTS ORGANIZED!!!! :banana

:bananinj when you get your frame back...just reverse the whole process and TAKE YOUR TIME :bananinj

:banadanc when in doubt refer back to the forum....there is tons of information and people here to help. :banadanc

GOOD LUCK

Y2K
27th July 2005, 03:18
You could buy one already chopped,that takes the hard part out of the equasion.
Then just change the little things that will make it yours.

diverguy
27th July 2005, 04:46
i was thinking about buying one chopped already, but they are hard to find. Plus i want a custom pain job wich means it has to come apart to paint the frame

I think I will try to do it myself. Afterall I will have months to do it during the winter. Plus the money i save from going to a shop, I could buy alot of my own tools

I just need to hear that It can de done by someone without any experience.

choppediron
27th July 2005, 23:14
this is the first bike I have ever worked on and I feel pretty confident about taking apart and rebuilding my bike...now alot of internal engine and tranny stuff i would leave to a shop. But if you have plenty of time go for it....nothing more gratifying. JUST TAKE YOUR TIME AND BE CAREFUL...KEEP EVERYTHING ORGANIZED!!!! Also make friends with one of the mechanics at your local shop....you will have tons of questions and they can always help and guide you along.

xllent01
28th July 2005, 00:11
This is my buddys chopped and raked sporty, it's just
a matter how deep your pockets are and how light your
wallet will become.
It's all in how you approach the whole situation, yes it is
more fun to stand back and say yes i did that. All you have
to do is be able to get in there, and not be afraid of getting
your hands dirty. Anything can be done, and don't let people
say you can't do it, cause that makes me want to prove them
all wrong.

http://nucite.net/isWext.php/5102/98121.jpg

tloon1
28th July 2005, 00:17
what are the degrees on those trees

tloon1
28th July 2005, 00:24
that bike is sharp

xllent01
28th July 2005, 02:52
The total neck rake is 40 degrees with the HHI triple trees.


:banadanc

choppediron
28th July 2005, 05:22
loce the look of that sporty

Greywolf
4th August 2005, 15:43
From what I've read 40 degrees rake is the max safe limit, some show bikes are way further out but they are trying to win in class.

leo_frantic
15th August 2005, 18:11
From what I've read 40 degrees rake is the max safe limit, some show bikes are way further out but they are trying to win in class.

It doesn't really matter (to a point) what the rake is, as long as the trail is correct. I built a bike with 52-degrees total rake and a trail dimension of 4-3/4" ... handled like a dream at low and high speed.