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jumpsteady
14th March 2011, 01:54
I am considering getting my wife her own Sporty but need a little help with a few things. I really think I want to get her an '07 or newer 883 because it is injected. She wouldn't have to mess with the choke. But I know that the rubber mount bikes weigh more. So would I be better to look for a '07 or newer 883 or try to find a slightly cheaper '00 through '03 solid mount 883?

kpiskin
14th March 2011, 01:59
My wife and I have matching Irons and are pleased with them. She never complains about weight issues.

xena
14th March 2011, 02:02
I doubt the weight difference is enough to notice
but why not see if you can find a Dealer to let
her ride one. She'll know if she likes it or not.
My guess is that she'll love it. Good luck! :)

Brad
14th March 2011, 02:06
Well, it is a girls bike, so that will work well! If you want FI, you are right, gotta go '07 or higher. But '04 to '06 are heavy too (bastard child rubbermounted carbs) so if you want a skinny bike, you have to go '03 or earlier.

I agree with xena that the weight won't seem like much. But if she can test ride it all the better

jumpsteady
14th March 2011, 02:11
She has never ridden a bike herself, and doesn't have a MC licence. So riding one will be kind of hard for her to do. Any other suggestions? Anything I am overlooking?

Brad
14th March 2011, 02:24
Have her straddle it and see if she can flat foot. For a new rider, that brings a lot of confidence. If an 883 is going to be her first bike, IMO it only matters if she feels secure on the bike. Chicks (unlike dudes) seem to understand that they can control speed with the throttle. She'll know what fits her!

RDK09
14th March 2011, 02:55
Have her take the MC classes and see how comfy she is on 2 wheels. After that the skies the limit IMO! Tell her good luck, she's gonna love it!! :tour

Likemlouder
14th March 2011, 03:27
my 02 if my wife had never rode i would start her off on a honda rebel or the suziki 250 looks and feels a lot like the sporty half the power and weight. the rebel holds its value well and would not be near as scary for the beginner. there is a reason they are so popular in the riders school. if ou are going sporty out the gate i agree on the efi the weight won't be as much of a problem for a new rider as the cough and stall factor. Good Luck whatever you decide

vwclogan
14th March 2011, 03:30
ya, id say go for the rebel for the first year or two, super light, very easy to learn and cheap as hell so when she dose lay it down, and she will just because everyone has to at some point in there life, its not to expensive or hard to fix and be riding the next day.

vwclogan
14th March 2011, 03:34
also heres a cool site for making it into a cool bobber if she ends up liking it

BCB Link (http://bluecollarbobbers.com/web/index.php?option=com_virtuemart&page=shop.browse&category_id=5&Itemid=24&TreeId=1&vmcchk=1&Itemid=24)

Woodie
14th March 2011, 03:39
Topeka Power Sports had a Rebel on the show floor a few weeks back...I was thinkin the same thing for my wife but she says she just wants to ride...my '05 is to heavy for her, she can barely put it up off the kick stand--she sat on some the 48 and Iron at Rawhide in KC and they seemed to fit her better

DaWind
14th March 2011, 04:41
My wife bought a new Superlow last September. She hadn't ridden on two wheels since she was a teenager and she's 56 now. She took the local riders course and got her MC endorsement before she purchased and she putted around a little on my '66. When she got the new bike she was VERY nervous and uncertain, wouldn't try to ride it on the street. The first two or three weeks I had to ride it over to the local high school parking lot so she could start/stop, ride around in circles without worrying about traffic. Then she got out on back roads and started picking up a little speed. By Christmas she was on the freeway and now I have to pay attention and keep up.
She wanted to do this and that's what made it happen. She's only five-three and 125 and not all that strong, but she handles the bike alright. She just needed some practice and confidence. If your wife wants to ride a EFI Sportster I'm sure she'll do fine too. The Superlow is certainly a nice, polite bike as Sportsters go.

Tin Man 2
14th March 2011, 14:53
Forget the Honda, Get her a Buell Blast !! They are easy to find for 2K or less and she can still buy Harley clothes without being a poser. The Blast is a good around town bike and you may want to keep it after she moves up to a Sporty.

Bone
14th March 2011, 15:19
I wouldn't do ANYTHING until after she completes the MSF. Then let HER decide what she wants (i.e. smaller/lighter/cheaper to start or Harley).

If she wants a Harley THEN she can decide if she wants a solidmount or a rubbermount and by then she can test ride yours vs. a new one.

DolderXL
14th March 2011, 15:53
I wouldn't do ANYTHING until after she completes the MSF. Then let HER decide what she wants (i.e. smaller/lighter/cheaper to start or Harley).

If she wants a Harley THEN she can decide if she wants a solidmount or a rubbermount and by then she can test ride yours vs. a new one.

+ 2.

I'd also add, it's not uncommon for women to take the MSF, do some short rides and say "That was a good experience, I learned a lot, but I think I prefer to chill out as the passenger most of the time". That's what my wife did. Nothing wrong with that, but just realize that it might or might not go as planned and spend accordingly.

redi2ride
14th March 2011, 16:01
I doubt the weight difference is enough to notice
but why not see if you can find a Dealer to let
her ride one. She'll know if she likes it or not.
My guess is that she'll love it. Good luck! :)

The HD dealers also put on women rider classes.

SuperTed
14th March 2011, 16:04
If you're not sure she'll stick with it, maybe you should consider a frame-mount EVO for price alone. You can get some pretty great deals on those these days and you won't lose most of your money when you decide to sell. If you buy a newer EFI bike, you'll drop the cash, turn the key, and won't be able to sell it for nearly what you put into it for a while.

vwclogan
14th March 2011, 16:04
The HD dealers also put on women rider classes.

lol not all the time, its usually 2 or 3 times a year, so sometime you have to wait a couple of months for the class to come up, and i would sign her up fast for them. the all women classes fill up fast at least where i live, we have to wait a while for my wife.

mxr33
14th March 2011, 16:32
not sure what riding classes are available in topeka but there is one in independence, mo rolling wheels that i have heard alot of positive feedback from. this is just east of kc and right down the street from my house. you could drop her off for the class and we can go for a ride.

dewrew
14th March 2011, 20:53
I wouldn't do ANYTHING until after she completes the MSF. Then let HER decide what she wants (i.e. smaller/lighter/cheaper to start or Harley).

If she wants a Harley THEN she can decide if she wants a solidmount or a rubbermount and by then she can test ride yours vs. a new one.

+1, Get her in a class and on a bike before throwing money at a bike

Iron Horse
14th March 2011, 21:30
I would definetly go for the heavier rubber mount, its a smooth ride. The weight is important. I was going up the NJ Turnpike this weekend & you figure the bike is 536 lbs minus my weight of 270 equals a 266 pound bike holding you down on the freeway, minus the wind lifting about 100 lbs of pressure off the bike, it felt like 150 lb bike holding me down on the ground, needless to say I was wobbling a bit, add in poor road conditions & the percentage of rubber meeting the road drasticly reduces.
Your BIG decision is going to be which new one to buy, dont think a 48 is in line, but maybe a struggle between the iron 883 & the superlow, which pretty much depends on your love of chrome. I got the blacked out iron, but it was a tough choice....good luck.

Woodie
15th March 2011, 03:11
Jumpsteady, they have a 2007 Nightster, silver and black, 4000 miles for $7950.00 at Ol Mac Motors just east of Washburn on 21st street. It's on page 89 of the March 11 issue of Wheels for You-the free sales adds you can get in the stores around town or www.wheelsforyoukansas.com. They also have a 2006 883 with 13K (no price listed) but it's in Mcpherson

steve-o-
31st March 2011, 14:50
Suzuki 650 Savage (S40?). Great starterthat's often overlooked. Thumpers rock!

Scott1953
31st March 2011, 18:12
I'd agree with the suggestion that she take the class first. My wife took it and decided that she really didn't like it. There were a dozen riders in the class with two instructors. In retrospect, she might have made it if it could be one on one. I wasn't sure if I should try to teach her, so she went to the class without any experience. To make a long story short, she came home before the class ended...no refund either. If I had bought a bike, it likely would have been a waste of money.

tmack-1
31st March 2011, 19:52
Suzuki 650 Savage (S40?). Great starterthat's often overlooked. Thumpers rock!

Sorry guys but I agree with Steve-O. Sporty's a tiny bit top heavy for a new rider. The Suzuki Savage/S40 (LS650) is a better starter bike. Single cylinder 650 cc. It's a very light weight bike (352 lbs) with low seat height and a low center of gravity (not top heavy like HD's). Yet in stock form it will keep up with the 883, with absolutely no problems, unlike a Honda 250. On the Honda 250's you really need to think about what gear you're in all the time because it develops it's HP at around 8K RPM which is close to the red-line. It sort of goes blah at cruising RPM's if you try to WOT. A new rider should be concentrating on the road and not have to worry having to downshift to get out of a situation.

AND.... if you un-EPA the carb on the LS650 and stick a Dyna Wide Glide SE muffler on it (fit's perfectly), you'll need to do the high Perf mod's on the 883 to touch it off the line. It's got a piston about the size of a Chevy 350 (3.94 in) and a square bore to stroke ratio (yea, some of you engine guys knows what that means.. ). Plus Quad valves so it breaths well. Plus, the bike has been almost unchanged since 1986 so parts are easy to get. Tins, heads, pistons, oil pump, carb, headlights (etc etc) from a 2011 will fit a 1986. Sort of Suzuki's little secret.

After she gets use to the LS650, get her a 1200........

khaskins
31st March 2011, 20:44
Send her through MSF before you spend money on a bike. My wife wanted to ride, I sent her to MSF, she completed it and now she does not want to ride. MSF reminded her of all of the things she did not like about riding on her own.

il67bp
31st March 2011, 21:37
Suzuki 650 Savage (S40?). Great starterthat's often overlooked. Thumpers rock!
i have one of those! love it

DIESEL
31st March 2011, 21:44
My wife started on a sporty...go for it.

I have an 07 1200 L for sale if you're interested. Motor replaced under warranty, 13k total on the clock about 4500 on the new motor. 6250 o.b.o.

DIESEL
31st March 2011, 21:44
BTW--she started on 07 883 standard. It has been lowered for her.

LifesHarlequin
31st March 2011, 21:57
Have her take the MC classes and see how comfy she is on 2 wheels. After that the skies the limit IMO! Tell her good luck, she's gonna love it!! :tour

+1

The MSF courses are great for just letting you know if you're even comfortable on the bike in the first place, and most will give you a choice between standards and cruisers. Then you'll go thru a whole set of emergency procedures practice and classroom sessions to keep you in the right mind set. HIGHLY RECOMMEND TO FIRST TIME RIDERS. They even take the time to make sure you understand the friction zone on a clutch so you're not constantly stalling the bike.

As for the weight, you're talking 50lbs and a loss of ground clearance, but the frame is a bit more stable and solid as a result. Like others have said, once she's taken the course, just put her on every type of bike she even remotely likes to see where she's comfortable. I've got to go thru this whole process myself once I scrounge the money to get the wife her own wheels.

Frenchpiggy1
1st April 2011, 00:56
As a newer female rider myself. I would say first off definatly take a class. If she would be more comfortable in an all womans class then wait until one is open. It doesnt have to be the riders edge class any beginner class would work to get her comfortable with the basics of riding. Or you could take her to an open space and teach her the basics, If after the class or you teaching her, she wants her own bike have her go to a dealership and sit on different bikes. I swore after taking the class I wanted a honda Rebel. thankfully my husband talked me out of it. I have ridden his bike a 01 1200c, our friends bike a 06 883 and my 09 nightster. I like my husbands bike and love mine. Even thought the nightster weighs more it is low and feels well balanced. Our friends 883 with stock shocks feels really top heavy and not as well balanced as the other bikes. Your wife would get a better feel for the bike if she was able to ride, but you can also sit on a bike and lean side to side and get an idea of if it feels balanced or top heavy to you.

RedBikeGirl
1st April 2011, 01:09
Jumpsteady, I am female, 52 years old, and a first time MC rider. Prior to June 2010 I rode a 50cc Honda Metropolitan (about 185 lbs, I think). I am 5'5". I took the Rider's Edge course last June, never ever ever having ridden a MC before, only the scoot. Awesome. Two weeks later I bought a 2009 XL1200 Custom and have had absolutely NO problems with the weight, height, power, any of it. I LOVE my bike and have NO second thoughts AT. ALL.

I agree with lots of the others. Let her take the class and then she can decide what's to tall/heavy/powerful for her.

Good Luck!!

RedBikeGirl
1st April 2011, 01:10
as a newer female rider myself. I would say first off definatly take a class. If she would be more comfortable in an all womans class then wait until one is open. It doesnt have to be the riders edge class any beginner class would work to get her comfortable with the basics of riding. Or you could take her to an open space and teach her the basics, if after the class or you teaching her, she wants her own bike have her go to a dealership and sit on different bikes. I swore after taking the class i wanted a honda rebel. Thankfully my husband talked me out of it. I have ridden his bike a 01 1200c, our friends bike a 06 883 and my 09 nightster. I like my husbands bike and love mine. Even thought the nightster weighs more it is low and feels well balanced. Our friends 883 with stock shocks feels really top heavy and not as well balanced as the other bikes. Your wife would get a better feel for the bike if she was able to ride, but you can also sit on a bike and lean side to side and get an idea of if it feels balanced or top heavy to you.

+1

funnythebunny
1st April 2011, 02:14
Check out the MSF Website (http://online2.msf-usa.org/msf/Default.aspx) and see where the closest riding school is...

The course can be alittle pricey, if she doesn't make it through. Rather than put her through the course without any idea, have her take a few private lessons from a certified instructor first and see if she likes it...

tmack-1
1st April 2011, 04:33
Check out the MSF Website (http://online2.msf-usa.org/msf/Default.aspx) and see where the closest riding school is...

The course can be alittle pricey, if she doesn't make it through. Rather than put her through the course without any idea, have her take a few private lessons from a certified instructor first and see if she likes it...

In some state's it's free..... like here in PA. :banana

jumpsteady
2nd April 2011, 17:11
Thanks for all of the responses. I think we are going to wait a little bit before chasing anything down. She really likes the Iron 883. She has sat on one a couple of different times at a couple of different dealerships, and has told me every time that she like it. She can reach all of the controls and stand flat footed while seated on it. So we will see how this summer works out. Thanks again.