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mikeabe
30th January 2005, 23:37
I ride rain or shine. She's never given me trouble before, but last time, she ran bad: At about 60 mph, an occasional cut-out (cough), and she wouldn't idle below about (I'm guessing) 2000 rpm. After she dried out, ran fine.

Would the Screamin' Eagle air filter be getting wet? Or would it be an electrical problem? If there's something fairly easy I could do, I would do it, rather than go to the hassle of taking it to the dealership.

Under warranty 2004 883.
Screamin' Eagle air cleaner.
Screamin' Eagle II mufflers
Bigger jets.
Proud owner since May 2004.

Thanks

toothygrin
30th January 2005, 23:41
I also ride in the rain though the only problem I get is the turnsignal (left) develops a mind of its own, turning on, not turning off. Mines all stock (883) no engine cut out.

whiffy
31st January 2005, 00:01
This is probably electrical. I have the SE air filter and have no problems with it getting wet (the oil stops that). Best to check all of the connector blocks, disconnect them and spray with WD40 or similar and re-connect. Check all the wiring and connections for short circuits, or rubbing on the frame. Silicone grease is good for putting in connector blocks or on exposed connections like on the ignition coils, keeps the water out and stops corrosion. Water in these places will conduct power to the most local ground point, and can give some head scratching in finding out what is wrong. Best to go over the whole lot with WD40, especially the ignition control unit, coil connections and ignition switch...

Good luck

Whiffi

Shu
31st January 2005, 01:00
Check your coil imput lead wires. These have a tendency to start to corrode and cause the condition you described. Also, if you are running the stock straight HD spark plug wires, pull them off the plugs and look inside the boot and see if you have corrosion in there. The factory wire boots do not seal very well on the wire. Also check the coil ends of the wires.

mikeabe
31st January 2005, 03:11
Thanks for the replies guys, I really appreciate it. I'll let you know how it runs after I implement your ideas.

SportsterBart
31st January 2005, 03:19
I had a similar problem when it was wet or even damp out.

Seems that the chrome plug/head bolt covers I had on were causing an arcing condition. Took them off and it ran fine.


Bart

gilx
31st January 2005, 03:41
I ride rain or shine. She's never given me trouble before, but last time, she ran bad: At about 60 mph, an occasional cut-out (cough), and she wouldn't idle below about (I'm guessing) 2000 rpm. After she dried out, ran fine...

What was the temperature? I had similar symptoms a week or so back. Very rough idle, I had to race the engine or it would die. Coughing and hesitation at higher speed. My bike was covered in moisture/ice when I started it. It was right at freezing. It started fine, but then almost immediately showed the above symptoms. After about 10 minutes of riding is seemed to get better, although right about then is when I got home. My best guess was I was icing out the moisture at the jet in my carb, leaning out the engine. Once the engine warmed enough to warm the carb, it seemed to get better. Happened two nights in a row, not before or since.

IronMick
31st January 2005, 03:49
Instead of WD40 you might try Electrical Contact Cleaner in a spray can. It is like brake parts cleaner - it sprays out hard to dissolve and clear out crud then evaporates very quickly so it will not attract dust etc and crud things up again.

Stephen Hawk
31st January 2005, 07:42
Chances are this is a moisture issue. Check all the ignition system connections and seal them with dielectric grease, not WD40. WD40 is extremely flamable and it is a voltage conductor which you do not want. In any event, seal it up and it should be fine. Small amounts of water in a vapor form are actually good for an engine as they remove carbon, hence the use of vapor injection units.

Hawk

Mechano
31st January 2005, 15:27
I ride rain or shine. She's never given me trouble before, but last time, she ran bad: At about 60 mph, an occasional cut-out (cough), and she wouldn't idle below about (I'm guessing) 2000 rpm. After she dried out, ran fine.

Would the Screamin' Eagle air filter be getting wet? Or would it be an electrical problem? If there's something fairly easy I could do, I would do it, rather than go to the hassle of taking it to the dealership.

Thanks

I had similar problems on my previous Vulcan 1500 Classic with an open K&N filter.
When washing it I was obliged to close with a plastic box the AC, few drops of water entering into the AC gave me some esitations on the engine. Everything went ok after dry.
So the same I had under rain. In fact I was searching for a better covered AC.

The same problem I had on other bikes, where lot of water went on coils and other electrical parts.
Nothing serious when the wires dry everything goes ok. But it's better to prevent putting the right silicon, grease and other right products to make them sealed or a bit water proof.

Gone
31st January 2005, 15:53
Chances are this is a moisture issue. Check all the ignition system connections and seal them with dielectric grease, not WD40. WD40 is extremely flamable and it is a voltage conductor which you do not want. In any event, seal it up and it should be fine. Small amounts of water in a vapor form are actually good for an engine as they remove carbon, hence the use of vapor injection units.

Hawk

Actually WD40 is exactly the right stuff to use for drying electrics. The name WD comes from the labs name for the project they were working on "Water Displacement" and 40 was the 40th try of getting the formula right -- the flammable part (and not used in all cans) is the propellent and that disapates very rapidly -- I have used WD40 for to dry ignitions in dune buggies and boats for many decades and it works splendidly. I have sprayed it inside distributor caps on wires and spark plugs and an engine that is wet -- actually ones that has been submerged in water 4 stroke and 2 stroke they will start right up. It is not a conductor but it does lift the water of the surface of the wire. What WD 40 is not the best at is a lubricant it is more of a solvent.

I'm liking icing here -- humid weather will increase the chances of carb icing and the only carb heating seems to be radiated from the cylinders -- it is an interesting condition because when you stop the engine and start to do the trouble shooting the problem it melts and disappears, 5 minutes and everything is back to working well again.

If it is a high voltage electrical thing such as a bad wire or boot -- try running the wet engine in the dark -- you will be able to see the arcs going to ground.

mikeabe
31st January 2005, 18:54
It was cold, but above freezing. Probably about 42.

Gone
31st January 2005, 19:13
Carb Icing is not a function of freezing as a matter of fact 42 and real humid is just about perfect. The Icing is formed as the air goes through the carb and reduces in pressure this removes heat from the air and can drop the temp of the intake air 30 to 40 degrees the moisture starts to freeze and the airflow starts to be restricted. (this pressure change is how refrigeration systems work).

The engine starts to loose power and roughen -- In a airplane this is the sign to add carb heat which melts the ice quickly and the engine will pick right back up and the pilot can start breathing regularly again.

Icing dosent usually occur when it is below freezing because cold air is usually to dry to add the moisture.

Most cars and even fuel injected systems have some provision for heating the throttle body or the carb.. The negative here is that warm air is not good for producing power.

The problem goes away if you stop the engine and let the manifold warm up a little. No damage is done to the engine.

Carb icing in Tampa florida middle of the summer less than a thousand feet with a corvair engine

http://www.flycorvair.com/carbice.html

If you look at look at the Sportster engine you will see a radial aircraft engine missing a few cylinders.

dwardy
31st January 2005, 20:03
That reminds me of a story. Several years ago, there was a local guy here that had a small plane. I don't recall offhand what kind but...
He was out flying one sunny Sunday afternoon and his carb heater took a dump on him. It didn't take long to ice up and he ended up landing the thing right in the middle of main street. Fortunately, nobody was hurt. There was a car with a skid mark on the roof and a bunch of power lines ripped down but everyone walked away.

whiffy
31st January 2005, 23:58
Hi All,

My bet is that this is carb icing. Had some of that today myself. Humid and around 5 degrees C.

I really must remember to put that isopropyl alcohol I bought into the fuel . Seems that this is what Harley charge an arm and leg for as a tickover or slow speed additive for winter use. It does help with the carb icing problem (dunno why but it does).

Still, WD40 will displace any water on the wiring if that was the problem. It will also leave a fine oil film that not only insulates but protects against corrosion. Sure it collects dust, but you can wipe that off when you next spray with WD40 ;)

Silicone grease is probably still a good idea for connectors of all sorts. I've used this for years on bikes and do not get any electrical problems, and also on RF kit up tall masts an places where you don't wanna go too often...stops corrosion keeping water out and is more durable than WD40 in the longer term.

My tuppence worth (or two cents to you guys)

Whiffy

Shu
1st February 2005, 00:02
I'm not sure why some are having trouble with carb icing and others like myself have never had an issue. I have ridden in some really cold conditions and even when it was right at freezing temps and so foggy you couldn't see 100 feet in front of you...never had even the slightest hint of carb icing.

Again, by the way mikeabe described his issue, I'd still bet on wet/damp coil input wires.

whiffy
1st February 2005, 00:37
Shu,

Must be the particular quality of our cold and damp in the UK..just ask Gordy.
I also get carb icing on a CAn-AM 250...

Or is it just me ????? (feeling rather sad for himself)

Whiffi

Gone
1st February 2005, 04:51
I'm not sure why some are having trouble with carb icing and others like myself have never had an issue. I have ridden in some really cold conditions and even when it was right at freezing temps and so foggy you couldn't see 100 feet in front of you...never had even the slightest hint of carb icing.

Again, by the way mikeabe described his issue, I'd still bet on wet/damp coil input wires.

Again the icing occurs at temperatures above freezing -- sometimes it can happen -- not always -- not even with two engines running next to each other -- but it does happen -- on a bike it is not a problem -- in an airplane, well it gets your full attn. immediately. Ask a pilot about carb ice you will get all the details -- just beaware it is not a function so much of airtemp as it is of the physical properties of a gas that is being decompressed.

mikeabe
4th March 2005, 20:48
I keep waiting for either a turd floater or a frog strangler before making my report. But in a light Texas rain (Utah thunderstorm) Vicious now runs like she don't even know it's rainin'. :tour The only thing I did was to put a fairly small amount of di-electric grease on both ends of the spark plug wire connections, and a little inside both boots. TURD FLOATER?? BRING IT!!!

Thanks again for the suggestions.