PDA

View Full Version : final wet sand on Clear Coat?????


SkippyRay
15th February 2005, 19:32
I have painted mt fenders with NightHawk Black paint did the whole layer wetsand, layer, wetsand, Put somewhere in the neighboorhood of 6 coats of paint, and now I started my Clear, I laid down a light base let it dry 24 hours, and then added a heavier coat, let it dry wetsnad with 1500 grit paper, put another coat of clear, did the same again. Finished it off with about 10 coats of clear. The question is... The final coat of clear looks like glass, do I really need to wet sand this again then use the finishing compound, or can I just add finishing compound without the final wetsand? I would hate to screw up this finish. Any suggestions would be great.





:abr::ar_cw3:

CuL8R
15th February 2005, 19:38
I'm not an expert by any stretch, but if the final coat looks good, why do you want to sand or use compound at all. I would think you could just wax it up and stick it on. But I am curious to know the right way as well.

SkippyRay
15th February 2005, 19:46
DUHHHHH cause the instructions on how to paint said to... Hell I dont know this is the 1st time I've tried this. Looks pretty good and the whole thing is costing around 50 bucks.

dmraco
15th February 2005, 19:48
My question is what is the final compound? A paint hardener??

If the final coat looks good, I would not sand. A very fine polishing compound may increase the shine a little and will not ruin it. After that...wax and wax away.

Post some photos of your work!

CuL8R
15th February 2005, 19:53
DUHHHHH cause the instructions on how to paint said to... Hell I dont know this is the 1st time I've tried this. Looks pretty good and the whole thing is costing around 50 bucks.
Please, don't misunderstan what I am sayin', cuz I don't know either. I am also curious as you are and want to know the answer as well. That is all. And as for the price...rock on. It sounds to me like you are geting a way better deal than you could have paied hundreds $$$ for someone else to do. I am also getting into the paint thing and am still learning, but I cant tell you how much money I have already saved by doing my own stuff and stuff for my friends. Best of luck, sounds like you are on the right track, and keep the rest of us posted on your progress so we can learn too.

Thanks!

SkippyRay
15th February 2005, 19:58
My comment was a failed attempt at a funny!! Not sure what the compound it is, its a wax like substance, I will go out to the paint store and see if they have any thing else to do. Also for any one out there. I do have a slight Orange Peel look to the paint (slight) but twith the clear coat and the black wrinkle finish on the rest of my bike it looks great, Kinda like it was made that way. So the Orange peel effect sometimes is a good thing, For me at least.

whiffy
15th February 2005, 21:17
Skippy,

If you dont mind orange peel just leave it. You could try some rubbing compound, once the paint has hardened real well, followed by 'T cut' or similar. Leave the paint to air dry for several days (7-14), or if you have a drying lamp or heat gun use that to fully harden the paint. This is cos the paint may still be soft under the top layer. Really the heat treatment is advised between every coat.

If you do not like orange peel than rub down as before with lots of water and fine paper until the peel has gone and you have a nice flat surface. Then polish with rubbing compound and T-cut to finsh. It helps to have a high speed air tool and a soft polishing mop cos it is hard work by hand. You will have a mirror finish that is dead smooth. Real pro finish.

Good luck

Whiffi

sportsterrific
15th February 2005, 21:22
I've done some painting, and I usually use a 2000 grit for the final sanding, followed by polishing compound (NOT rubbing compund), Then a proper waxing and you should be good to go. Good luck!

SkippyRay
15th February 2005, 21:32
Now Im really confused,,, Rubbing or Finishing /Polishing compound.? Can I use the polishing compound on the clear with out sanding or should I. I dont know

whiffy
15th February 2005, 21:34
I've done some painting, and I usually use a 2000 grit for the final sanding, followed by polishing compound (NOT rubbing compund), Then a proper waxing and you should be good to go. Good luck!

Here in UK rubbing compound can mean polishing compound, so thanks for the correction. Rubbing compound may be a bit abrasive. I've done some paint too, over the years. T-Cut is good for final finishing cos it is very mild and leaves no residue. Can paint over the top if needed with no hassles.

Whiff

SkippyRay
15th February 2005, 21:41
MUCH THANKS!!!!!

sportsterrific
15th February 2005, 22:15
You'd use a rubbing compound to cut down your primer coat and first few finish coats and to clean up old paint, not for finishing a final coat of new paint.

xllent01
16th February 2005, 01:44
SkippyRay,
Paint is a delicate process, you must have the right amount of
hardener to help it cure faster. Heat or a painters oven is a good
idea when you finish with the clear coat, or you can let it sit out
in the sun for awhile, Be careful with to many layers real fast cause
you will get the orange peel effect like you said.{a thick mill- painters terms}

Better to put a fine mist on and watch the corners cause that is were the
paint will pile up the fastest, and you will get runs. Once you are satisfied with the final clear coat use a orbital buffer and some polishing compound {not rubbing compound} and lightly buff to a high luster. CAUTION if you have never used this process you will burn thru paint faster than you can blink an eye!!!!
One other thing, paint is always curing {releasing chemicals} or aging. Wait
at least 6-8 months before you put any wax on. Waxing curing paint will seal
it up and the chemical release will stop on your paint. This will damage curing
paint and lead to a shorter life span of the paint.

Painting is a blast used to paint full time in my yougin days. Painted my
sporty last year just to set it apart from the other 1,000,000 clones out there.:yikes

alleydude
16th February 2005, 02:10
Great info. Gonna be painting my Electra Glide this summer. My biggest fear is when I mask for a second color I will end up pealing off the first color when the mask is removed. What can I do to ensure this doesn't happen?

xllent01
16th February 2005, 02:20
Great info. Gonna be painting my Electra Glide this summer. My biggest fear is when I mask for a second color I will end up pealing off the first color when the mask is removed. What can I do to ensure this doesn't happen?
The first color has to be dried for atleast 24 hrs before 2nd color
is applied for a two tone. When pulling off masking tape always
pull tape at a 90 degree angle to the painted surface. Pull tape
slowly to avoid damaging 2nd layer of two tone. Hope this helps :yikes

alleydude
16th February 2005, 02:24
Thanks. I wish someone would write a "Painting 101" article, I've tried to find one in bookstores and websites, but have failed in my search. Anyone know were to find such info? Or anyone care to write this up?

mickes
16th February 2005, 03:10
Thanks. I wish someone would write a "Painting 101" article, I've tried to find one in bookstores and websites, but have failed in my search. Anyone know were to find such info? Or anyone care to write this up?

Been searching for this info for months... The most help I found was from this forum (http://novogate.com/exco/index.php?boardid=483) and reading the tech sheets on House of Kolor paint (http://www.hokpaint.com). I just painted my bike using HOK Metal Flake and Kandy for the first time and it turned out great... just followed the Tech sheets.... for the most part. :shhhh

xllent01
16th February 2005, 04:06
These tins were painted with silver base and HOK Cobalt
Candy Blue. They change colors in different lights depending
on the angle you look at them. Painted ghost flames and stripped
them also.
Hotrods and Hot Bikes need flames painted on them :yikes

Kenny
16th February 2005, 04:25
After a final wet sand with 2500 I use Novus #3 then #2 with a mouse sander and micro fiber cloth rubber banded around it. The Novus is intended for acrylic and plastics but what is paint anyway.

http://img141.exs.cx/img141/6117/img15261xq.jpg (http://www.imageshack.us)

These are the 64 oz. jugs but you can find smaller jugs (hee hee) at 8 oz. for around 6 or 7 bucks U.S. the micro fiber cloth is around 2 bucks a piece.

Turbota
16th February 2005, 05:01
I don't know much about paint finishing, but my son gave me a quart of this stuff that is used to polish out re-painted sufaces. Made by 3M and is supposed to be a professional product.

Anyone see or use this stuff before?

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v248/Turbota/DSCN0527.jpg

flathead45
16th February 2005, 13:50
do not wax new paint for at least a month

hope I got your attention , new paint is still "wet" underneath and it is slowly drying out from the inside out, this will take awhile and wax will prevent it from "cure"ing properly

sportsterrific
16th February 2005, 14:04
Is there not a distinction between lacquer and enamels? I though lacquer dires by exposure to air while enamel dries by chemical reaction?
BTW, someone advised drying your paint out in the sun. I don't think this is a good idea because you also expose your paint job to dust, bird poop and other environmental hazards.

mickes
16th February 2005, 15:34
I though lacquer dires by exposure to air while enamel dries by chemical reaction?

This is true... But Enamels still needs to breath for a month or so befor waxing. Waxing too soon may trap some solvents and turn the clear cloudy.

sportsterrific
16th February 2005, 16:17
That's what I thought- an Enamel paint needs exposure to air to allow the chemical reaction to take place, while a lacquer dries pretty much right away.
Anyway, the little bit of rattle-can painting I've done has been with lacquers and I've had prety good success.

SkippyRay
16th February 2005, 16:28
Thanks for the info and your paint looks great. A sight better than mine. But hey Im only tring to impress 1 person.....ME....I did it. Will take a pic or 2 and post it. I spent last night cusing and fusing trying to get the rear fender on without screwing up the paint. And of course I nicked it (right under the strut) you cant see it and Im warming up the the ole spot brush. It has dried for 2 days now so I thought it was ok to put it back on. (im itching to get it together its been GREAT weather here in OK) I am working on the front fender and it is giving me a bitch fit. I had ZERO runs in the rear. But the front where it mounts to the forks is driving me nutz. If i spray light coats it wont cover the edges worth crud. If I spray to heavy it runs. AAAAARRRRRGGGGGG. Also would any one laugh at me if I didnt concentrate too much on the under side of the fenders, I mean hell they get filthy anyway so no need to make them glass like right? Please say yes cause that is what I did to the rear fender. Spray spray clear clear the end. I really dont want to take that thing off and shoot the underside again. You can't even see it. Oh well, if it aint shit-slappy then it wouldn't have been done by me. But for 42 bucks not too shabby. The finishing compound I have says it is a polishing compound that takes out minor wetsand swrils and the like. I put it on and buffed it in like it said and DANG it looks purty! :) I hope that was the right stuff I hate to be riding down the road with paint flying off HAHAHAHAHA. Thanks again guys/gals/aliens/monsters/...oh hell bikers

Kentucky
30th August 2006, 00:48
do not wax new paint for at least a month

hope I got your attention , new paint is still "wet" underneath and it is slowly drying out from the inside out, this will take awhile and wax will prevent it from "cure"ing properly

It depends on the paint, the paint process and how it was cured. The above isn't necessarily true at all. We used to paint, color sand, buff and wax in 9 days and you could count your shoe laces in the paint. A mirror finish in 9 days no problem and we were usuing Dupont paint.....

bsporty
30th August 2006, 02:22
If your clear coat looks awesome leave it alone!You dont need to wetsand and buff.Usually that is only done to remove imperfections in the clear coat.
When you apply clear coat you should actually only apply 2 wet coats.The fact that you have 10 coats makes youre paint weak and prone to chips because of the heavy layer of material on the metal.There is a flash time that clear coat needs and it is usually 3-6 minutes not 24 hours but I dont know what kind of clear you used.and YOU CAN WAX your new paint job as
long as the was doesnt contain silicones...try wizards products...they make a wax, shine master, that is ready to apply 24 hours after paint is dry.It has a uv barrier too.
www.wizardsproducts.com
I hope this helps!


:abr::ar_cw3:[/QUOTE]

rickxx
30th August 2006, 02:30
lotta good info here. we need a painting 101 sticky! i bought some fenders i'm going to repaint this fall. calling all paint experts!

cphilip
1st September 2006, 03:17
Agreed. Well put on clear coat needs nothing done to it. If its properly applied it is done when its dry. If yours looks smooth as glass.... your done.

dmraco
1st September 2006, 03:58
I know we are little further along in the process, but has anyone used a primer sealer before painting?? Pros? Cons?

silverswitch
6th September 2006, 17:50
I worked as a painter before joining the Army. With that many coats of clear and the amount of wetsanding that was done between coats you should be good to go. If it looks like glass then your done. The only thing left to do is open up the throttle after mounting all the tin back on the bike. 10 coats...wow, that shit aint going to scratch.

milmat1
26th November 2006, 06:57
I Vote For The Painting 101 Sticky !!!

66impala
30th November 2006, 16:11
10 coats of urethane is alot of paint, 10 coats of lacquer yrs ago was the thing to do because after wet sanding and buffing you took off a few layers.

Im leaving a great site for painting information, I sat in this painter at Carlisle Pa. and was impressed. Click on the forums and read some of the posts.

http://www.paintucation.com/

Ive done 5 cars in my garage over the years and many smaller projects, the hardest part is buffing out paint. I usually stick with the fact sheets that PPG supplies and follow the flash times between coats. The longer urethane paint sits up the harder it gets and the harder it will be to rub out, I found this out the hard way.

snowman
30th November 2006, 16:47
Thanks for the site!! I'm thinking of 2 of these for Christmas now..:geek:geek:geek

1stGenRex
30th November 2006, 20:41
I worked as a painter before joining the Army. With that many coats of clear and the amount of wetsanding that was done between coats you should be good to go. If it looks like glass then your done. The only thing left to do is open up the throttle after mounting all the tin back on the bike. 10 coats...wow, that shit aint going to scratch.


NO KIDDING!!!!

I hope you did all the prep work correctly though!

DaMongNiu
30th November 2006, 22:31
Skippy,
Rubbing compound usually has rougher grit than polishing compound. The main difference in compounds is the grit, just like sandpaper. Start with heavy grit and work to fine grit usually.
If you like how it looks, then leave it alone. Final sanding is to flatten "orange peel" or other slight imperfections, then compound to get good reflective quality.