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johnnybgood
29th September 2008, 23:02
What's your opinion on these (http://wjz.com/local/motorcycle.deaths.laws.2.825827.html) new MD laws?

Is a $1,000 fine and risk of a license suspension enough to keep a cager from turning left in front of you? Doubtful, it's not like they do it on purpose anyway (I hope).

LED lights being legal is a good thing.

John

shotgun46
29th September 2008, 23:07
Its not enough ! I am Not sure but A friend got hit and the cager got Hauled away for an automatic 14 days plus Fines ! neither person was drinking !

Brad
29th September 2008, 23:20
I don't see this as something that promotes safety, but it will help MD enhance their revenue.

Like you said, I don't think it will make anyone think before they act.

brprider
29th September 2008, 23:22
No doubt about it, this one is a sore subject for me and many of my friends. I lost a good friend last summer and and there have been a rash of motorcycle / car crashes here lately. In the majority of the crashes, the driver was elderly and they all said that they didn't see the bike. $1,000 and a suspended license is a joke. The wrecks never would have happened in the first place if the Dept. of motor vehicles would start with a real on the road drivers test when a person first gets a license and then on the road (not in a parking lot around cones) tests every 2-3 years. A mandatory vision test wouldn't hurt either. I'm willing to be tested right away. If I don't pass, then I would be one less potential killer on the road. My dad quit driving voluntarily at 75 and now uses taxi's and gets rides with friends whenever possible. He drove for a living for over 50 years and knew that his reaction times and vision had deteriorated to the point that he was becoming unsafe. Smart man.
Just my 2 cents. I'll get off my soapbox now.

wandrur
29th September 2008, 23:51
I would think that we would be at least a little supportive of this... Let me explain.

How many times to do see on the forum some thread freaking out about helmet laws or noise policies or laws that some of us feel infringe upon our 'rights' as motorcyclists, yet when a state decides to pass a law that might somehow address the increasing deaths in car/motorcycle accidents (of which they say more than *half* are *not* the motorcyclists' fault), we say it's not enough? I think it's at least a step in the right direction and that lawmakers should at least get a thank-you while still urging them to do as much as they can do to make the roads even safer for us.

We know cagers hardly see us. In that sort of situation, about the only thing we can do is hope that a threat of harsher punishment will cause them to be more aware of us two-wheeled commuters in order to provide some sort of protection. If $1000 and a suspended license isn't enough, what is the alternative? Anyone know what the penalty is for causing a similar accident that didn't involve a motorcycle?

To the point of the LEDs--sweet. One more way that *we* can make ourselves seen and have it be legal (and acknowledged as such) .

brprider,
When you are talking about an on-the-road driving test being required, are you talking about for cars or bikes? It's unclear from your message. To the point of the mandatory vision test, is this not required in your state? I'm pretty sure it is required in Colorado, though now that I'm thinking about it, perhaps it is only required for initially obtaining a license. Should check on that. If it's *not* mandatory, then I completely agree with you that it should be. It's rather stupid to not have proper vision be a requirement for a license!!

Rascal
30th September 2008, 00:11
This one got my attention, the following is quoted from the website:

"The administration says more than half of the motorcycle crashes are not the motorcycle driver's fault. Eight of 10 crashes injure or kill a motorcycle's passengers."

shotgun46
30th September 2008, 00:41
I say Its not enough Because Driver Awareness Is not published Enough ! It should be all Over the Radio & T V Non Stop ! and Yes Its a Step in the Right Direction ! And I feel If a Driver of a car hits a Biker or Bike They should Have to attend a Class to make them Aware or even have to sit At Motor Cycle Safety Class for the Whole thing and watch and take the test But not ride ! I don't have any other Ideas we could have Flashing Beacons on our heads and they Just don't Look !

Jt1200r
30th September 2008, 00:51
what i dont like is it says "could be fined up to". other than that its a start as long as all drivers get a letter about it

johnnybgood
30th September 2008, 01:53
I like the idea of more stringent and frequent testing (unless I can't pass it :laugh.) Way to easy for unqualified drivers to get and keep a drivers license.

John

wandrur
30th September 2008, 02:40
I say Its not enough Because Driver Awareness Is not published Enough ! It should be all Over the Radio & T V Non Stop ! and Yes Its a Step in the Right Direction ! And I feel If a Driver of a car hits a Biker or Bike They should Have to attend a Class to make them Aware or even have to sit At Motor Cycle Safety Class for the Whole thing and watch and take the test But not ride ! I don't have any other Ideas we could have Flashing Beacons on our heads and they Just don't Look !

Agreed.

what i dont like is it says "could be fined up to". other than that its a start as long as all drivers get a letter about it

Agreed again.

I like the idea of more stringent and frequent testing (unless I can't pass it :laugh.) Way to easy for unqualified drivers to get and keep a drivers license.

John

And...agreed, yet again.

DunderFrank
30th September 2008, 12:35
I am in agreement with Wandrur
It is something....A step in some direction
I don't know what would be enough unless they made cars illegal
I figure take what you can get
and put this out on the airways, television an newspapers to
make everyone aware of the new law

gypsysailor
30th September 2008, 13:37
A step in the right direction, yes.
Enough? A better question for you / us would be are you involved in your local and national motorcycle rights organizations? Are you writing your representitives. Here in Texas we have several organizations that work together for the good of all and they do make a difference. Is that enough? nope, it's gonna take all of us.

brprider
30th September 2008, 16:36
Wandrur,
I was referring to road testing for "all" licensed drivers. The reason that I stress this, is because if you have the money and can navigate around some cones in a parking lot, you will get your initial auto license. No real skill required. Motorcycle operation requires an endorsement. As of last July you must take a safety course to get that. Renewals can be done online and the vision test is only required for people 80 years old and older. :wonderlan Man, I know that I'll be sleeping better tonight knowing that. My mom who lives in Scotland had to take a very tough road test, which she failed the first time. The examiner explained to her why she failed and although she will be driving in a rural area, felt that she wasn't qualified to possess a license at that time. When she lived in the states, she only needed to pay the renewal fee. :frownthre

Rock Bottom
30th September 2008, 17:04
Yes, It's a start, But education needs to be used also! In 1974, I had a woman turn left in front of me. I had my headlight on BRIGHT, wearing a RED flannel shirt & she still claimed she didn't see me till I T-Boned her car & flew over the hood. She got a "Failure to yeild" ticket for $35.00 & I got a totaled M/C , Shattered right hand, 4 broken ribs, broken left ankel & road rash like you wouldn't beleive. Out of work for 8 months & all she could say was "Sorry, I didn't see you". We need more punshisment for the cagers!

hmiller
30th September 2008, 17:13
It's at least a start.

Last night I had a young girl turn left in front of me. She was talking on her cell phone with no directionals on, luckily I had enough time to swerve/brake/skid so I didn't t-bone her and even after all that she didn't even seem like she saw me, I guess it was a very interesting conversation.

wandrur
1st October 2008, 16:29
Wandrur,
I was referring to road testing for "all" licensed drivers. The reason that I stress this, is because if you have the money and can navigate around some cones in a parking lot, you will get your initial auto license. No real skill required. Motorcycle operation requires an endorsement. As of last July you must take a safety course to get that. Renewals can be done online and the vision test is only required for people 80 years old and older. :wonderlan Man, I know that I'll be sleeping better tonight knowing that. My mom who lives in Scotland had to take a very tough road test, which she failed the first time. The examiner explained to her why she failed and although she will be driving in a rural area, felt that she wasn't qualified to possess a license at that time. When she lived in the states, she only needed to pay the renewal fee. :frownthre

Gotcha. Like I said, I definitely think vision tests should be mandatory every few years, perhaps every other renewal or whatever. And requiring after 80 is a little much...maybe after 60 or something.

And that's sketchy about your mom.

As for the motorcycle "endorsement" and safety test--Colorado has two options for the endorsement. The first--and, I think, most common--is a skills test that is evaluated behind or somewhere near the DMV office that consists of braking evaluation, a figure eight, a cone weave, and a couple of other things. You pass that, then take a written test, and voila. As for the safety test, you pay some money (~$120 for the 'experienced rider' MSF endorsed course with the licensing test waiver, 6 hours), complete the course, and take the card into the DMV and get your endorsement. BUT, never do you get over 30 miles per hour during this 'safety' course, and while it's geared toward the 'experienced' rider, that experience could have been anything and anywhere. There's no highway test. And that's the thing I disagree with the most.

I think new motorcyclists should be required to take a highway riding test and get up to at least 55 mph. While handling a bike at lower speeds may be harder in many ways, riding at highway speeds--especially in traffic--takes a different skill set, and the possibilities for sever bodily damage to self and/or others while wrecking at highway speeds are much higher.