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xena
14th March 2005, 17:47
As many of you know, over the weekend I installed a white brothers fork spring lowering kit. This is not the same as just replacing your fork springs, since the kit involves replacing the stock rebound spring, which involves removing the fork legs from the bike, tipping them upside down so the damper rod falls out, and replacing the rebound spring located on the damper in addition to replacing the larger fork spring itself.
It's a messy job, but not all that difficult if you've got a service manual and the kit instructions, which were quite clear.
The most difficult part of the job imo, was re-installing the fork caps. Being female, I just didn't have the upper arm strength to muscle those caps down to the point where I could get the threads started. I got a lot of good suggestions from members, but none of which would work for me because I lacked the strength needed. Finally, after wrestling with the caps to the point where my arms were shaking, I thought of one last idea that indeed did work - and much easier than using a ratchet, because I found the ratchet to be awkward and with one hand I just couldn't apply enough pressure to get the caps down enough to begin the threads.
I took a 1/2" drive breaker bar, and put the 1 3/8" socket on the end. Standing in front of the bike, I placed the socket on the cap, while holding the breaker bar straight up with two hands, I pushed down while at the same twisting the bar to get the threads started. Once I had a few threads started, I used a torque wrench to torque the caps per spec. This method allows you to use two hands which inevitably enables you to apply the most force possible, and also is nice because things like your speedo, bars, etc. will not be in your way because you are holding the bar up high.

Although there is a fork spring compression tool available for purchase, the only ones I saw were well over 100.00 dollars, and this method is SO much easier than the ways I've seen recommended.
Hope this helps someone in the future!

Xena

Turbota
14th March 2005, 18:16
Great idea! .... picture and everything!

Ron,

Chuck
14th March 2005, 18:18
Very good point Xena. :clap
I just brought that up the other day ( to use an extention on the socket to get that nut started) to someones post, maybe Turbo's. I never saw it mentioned before either.

Darhawk
14th March 2005, 18:18
Good photo Xena...........

cantolina
14th March 2005, 18:20
Just like Dad told me.....stare at it long enough, and the answers come to ya!

Great job, and excellent problem solving!

Thanx for the pic, it helped out with the visualization...

gearhead1972
14th March 2005, 18:32
:clap Glad you got it together, see everyone here but yourself knew you could do it now get to :tour

IronMick
14th March 2005, 18:58
... we all should have paid more attention during physics class; various principles such as the lever etc are good to know. I do not, however know which principle applies here. Any physics guys out there?

TechRep
14th March 2005, 19:00
Good job!!!!!

Chuck
14th March 2005, 19:04
Okay that's enough, run against Hillary! :D

thunderpaw
15th March 2005, 01:47
Although there is a fork spring compression tool available for purchase, the only ones I saw were well over 100.00 dollars,

:headbang :headbang :headbang :headbang :headbang

Dadburn it! I struggled with this site's obvious disdain for any attempt of mine at uploading a photograph, and was finally able to post an illustrated how-to on making a near exact clone of that $100 Trock fork spring compressor for only $15!!! It works great-using it allowed me to start the fork caps with my fingers!
Never could arouse any interest in it.
If there ever is any interest in it, I will try to post all of the information again assuming, whatever gremlins that have prevented me from uploading photos for the past month or so are found and conquered.

Kim

:headbang :headbang :headbang :headbang :headbang

xena
15th March 2005, 01:59
Thunderpaw, had I known how hard it was going to be I'd have definitely been interested in that - if I had even known you made one, which I didn't. Shoooot, I'd even pay you double that to make me one.
I think people don't realize just how tough it is to get those bastards back on until they're in the middle of it.

bubbahog
15th March 2005, 03:38
Quite possibly the perfect woman.

barry1967
15th March 2005, 03:50
Well, almost perfect. eh Zena? ;)

xena
15th March 2005, 03:59
Lol. I guess bubbahog doesn't know I've got a big L shaped, rainbow striped horn protruding from the top of my head. ;)

barry1967
15th March 2005, 04:03
ROTFLMAO....I almost pissed myself.......xena

rottenralph
15th March 2005, 04:31
My wife has two horns and she aint no unicorn.

txsporty
15th March 2005, 04:51
Xena

Good to hear you got it Done!!!

:clap :clap :clap :clap :clap :clap :clap :clap :clap

bubbahog
15th March 2005, 05:22
My wife has two horns and she aint no unicorn.

She's horny? What are you doing here?

Moved On
15th March 2005, 05:26
Just like Dad told me.....stare at it long enough, and the answers come to ya!Okay Paulie... Where's Sr. tonight in Newnan :laugh

Gazza

gearhead1972
15th March 2005, 06:56
Lol. I guess bubbahog doesn't know I've got a big L shaped, rainbow striped horn protruding from the top of my head. ;)
now thats some funny shit lol :clap

xena
15th March 2005, 07:45
:headbang :headbang :headbang :headbang :headbang

Dadburn it! I struggled with this site's obvious disdain for any attempt of mine at uploading a photograph, and was finally able to post an illustrated how-to on making a near exact clone of that $100 Trock fork spring compressor for only $15!!! It works great-using it allowed me to start the fork caps with my fingers!
Never could arouse any interest in it.
If there ever is any interest in it, I will try to post all of the information again assuming, whatever gremlins that have prevented me from uploading photos for the past month or so are found and conquered.

Kim

:headbang :headbang :headbang :headbang :headbang

Thunderpaw - You are brilliant my friend! And here the rest of us are wrestling those little brutes with sockets.....LMAO. I am very interested in hearing more about your low cost home made fork spring compressor. Maybe you can get a parts list and a little how-to together, then you can ask a mod to make it a sticky in this category. I really think many people would benefit from it.

Nu Viking
16th March 2005, 08:25
Well you see,,,, we knew you could do it. And that was useing the noggin.

MidWest XL
16th March 2005, 12:35
Xena

Don't forget to post your "before and after" pics. Can't wait to ses your transformation and comments on how it rides now.

bplinson
16th March 2005, 14:07
Good job Xena. I will be doing some fork work for the first time soon so I am glad to see how it is done.

What size are the fork caps?? I need to buy some sockets.

xena
16th March 2005, 16:20
Midwest after I can test ride it I'll post up some b'fore and aft pics, but I'm not sure that the drop is visually noticeable because the rear of the bike was already lowered 1" before I put in the front kit.

Bert, the caps are 1 3/8" and although difficult to find, they do make that socket in a 1/2" drive because I borrowed one from a friend.

thunderpaw
17th March 2005, 03:30
Best place I've found for the 1 3/8 socket is AutoZone...about five bucks.

Kim

thunderpaw
19th March 2005, 23:26
Thanks to Bert's tireless work, I can finally upload again!

This first shot is of the commercially available Trock fork spring compressor. It sells for between $100-$128:
http://xlforum.net/photopost/data/500/trock_spring_compressor.jpg

This next shot is what I built for $15
http://xlforum.net/photopost/data/500/compressor_on_floor.jpg

Here I am beginning to compress the fork spring:
http://xlforum.net/photopost/data/500/starting_to_compress.jpg

Here is a closeup of starting to compress the spring:
http://xlforum.net/photopost/data/500/start_compression_closeup.jpg

After a few squeezes of the compressor, it looks like this:
http://xlforum.net/photopost/data/500/compressed_closeup.jpg
At this stage, if you had put a little film of grease on the orange pad, you can literally turn the socket with your fingers and screw the fork cap in.
It really is that easy!

This is my $2 equivalent to Progressive Suspension's $35 "Pro Oil Level Tool":
http://xlforum.net/photopost/data/500/fork_oil_tool.jpg

I would be glad to go into detail on what exactly I used, where I got it and how much it cost, if anyone is interested, and/or if it warrants "sticky status". I had wrestled for years, doing just like Xena and others had...forcing the caps/springs into the tubes and trying to simultaneously twist to start the thread...usually turning my palm to hamburger, lol!
Then I saw the Trock tool and the little "light" in my head went off...I just knew I could (read: anybody could) replicate that tool out of cheap, readily available "stuff".

Kim

ShortBus
24th March 2005, 20:06
Very cool thunderpaw! I may need to make one of those, since my forks are laying in pieces all over my shop. I'm finally getting around to installing my RaceTech fork emulators, since it's suppose to rain for the next couple weeks. Damn I hate seeing the scoot incapacitated!

For those of you who haven't pulled their forks apart before, and plan on removing the dampening rod, you'll need a 6mm Allen socket in 1/4 inch drive, at least that's what an '02 883R uses (Showa forks). I also had to smack the dampening rod bolt a few times using a drift punch to break the thread locking compound loose. Those little suckers were tight!

Harbor Freight had a 1/4 inch drive metric Allen head socket set for $2. They also had a nice little aluminum v-block for my drill press. Makes it so much easier to drill tubing.

I'm taking pictures as I go, in the hopes that I'll get around to posting them for those interested.

Gone
13th April 2005, 01:53
I just received my Progressive springs today in the mail, looked at the generic instructions and wondered how the hell was I going to get this job done. So I did as I have done so many times (as in "What the hell do they mean by taxes paid...", etc.) and did a search on the Forum. So all that being said, a very humble thank you and courteous bow at the waist arms extended upward to Xena and Thunderpaw... YOU FRIGGIN GUYS ROCK!!!!! :clap

Now, where can I get me some fork oil...? Sam's club was fresh out.

Taxes paid!!! (finally) Now let the tweaking begin!!!!

Progressive 418's installed
Progressive Fork Springs (see above)
Synth Oil Change at 1,000
BUB Jug Huggers
SE ICM (didn't really need it but I can't resist an eBay bargain)
SE Air Filter & Re-jet
4.5" Chrome Risers

Coming this summer 883 to 1200 conversion....(insert evil laugh here) Muah ha ha

Gone
17th April 2005, 01:33
Well with all the helpful info and useful devices the whole procedure took me less than 1 hour and that includes clean-up. :tour

I already had a clamp in the shop so I adapted Thunderpaw's design by using a pair of locking pliers to hold two 1 1/4 " electrical straps that I taped up beforehand so they wouldn't scratch the fork. Just for fun I also tried the old fashioned push down method and gave up on the third try, mainly because I was afraid that I might start the theads off wrong and muck things up, oh and my palms were starting to hurt... The tool made all the difference! Once again, a deep bow to Thunderpaw!

I used Belray 15 weight fork oil @ 9.5 fluid ounces per fork. I have a 2004 sporty and just to double check the oil amount I re-measured the fork oil that I took out of the bike and accounting for spilage the amount was right around 9 fluid ounces per side.

Now the ride..... DAMN! With the Progressive springs in front and the 418's in the rear the bike handles like a dream! No more mushy stops and bone rattling bumps. She even sits up prettier (could be my imagination)...

Once again, this proves to be the most useful Harley forum on the net, bar none!

cantolina
17th April 2005, 04:36
I wonder if I'm going to have this issue after I get Progressive springs? I don't have any issues getting my caps back on by hand now....but I understand why one would....

Kelley
21st April 2005, 17:14
Thunderpaw you are a genuis :D What did you use to clamp onto the forks. I could use the electrical straps that xhoodlum used but I like the look of yours, very professional looking in a shadetree mechanic way. I haven't given much thought to changing my fork springs untill the last couple of weeks riding and now for the money it seems to be a wise investment. There is no other forum w/ helpful and knowledgeable people .....

thunderpaw
22nd April 2005, 00:45
Thanks, Kelley. The whole deal is super simple. The clamp is a Jorgensen 'EZ Hold II'...I got it at Sears for $9.99. The 'clamp' is simply part of a gate latch for a chain link fence...$2 at Home Depot. I wrapped the 'clamp' with cold-shrink tape (fabulous stuff...no adhesive!) Other than that, it was five nuts and bolts and a spacer made from an old road sign to align the tool so that the orange pad was aligned with the opening (for the fork tube) of the gate latch piece. Do use a light coating of grease on the orange pad...it will let you start the fork cap with just your fingers on the 1 3/8 inch socket.
These are the 'basic' ingredients: clamp, gate latch and tape:
http://xlforum.net/photopost/data/500/original_clamp.jpg
This shows all the little pieces I used (the aluminum brackets were made from an old road sign, the two odd looking pieces with large holes to the left of the aluminum are simply for taking up some slack between the end of the clamp and the gate latch...washers would be fine)
http://xlforum.net/photopost/data/500/disassembled_clamp.jpg
This is the assembled tool:
http://xlforum.net/photopost/data/500/compressor_on_floor.jpg
This is an end view showing the aluminum pieces bolted to the clamp arm, and the two 'might as well use washers' pieces sandwiched between the gate latch halves. A nut and bolt through the right side holes (not shown) tightens the clamp against the fork tube...finger tight is fine.
http://xlforum.net/photopost/data/500/end_view_of_clamp.jpg
This is the location of the two holes I drilled in the end of the clamp arm (to match the holes in the gate latch):
http://xlforum.net/photopost/data/500/holes_in_clamp.jpg
This is the 3M 'Temflex' cold shrink tape.
http://xlforum.net/photopost/data/500/temflex_tape.jpg
Hard to see how Progressive can charge $34 for theirs when you can build this for $2...it's a 60cc (2 oz) catheter-tipped syringe...available at a home health supply or large animal supply:
http://xlforum.net/photopost/data/500/fork_oil_tool.jpg
I added a short length of scrap copper tubing and a short length of scrap vinyl tubing. I measured the prescribed level of oil for the tubes and attached a small vise grip at that level...just add oil to the tubes and suction out the excess...perfectly matched levels.

Good luck!

As an added bonus: remove the gate latch from the clamp arm, reattach the other orange pad and, voila!...you have a perfectly functioning clamp once more!


Kim

Kelley
22nd April 2005, 16:36
Once again, absolutely genuis, form and function. Thanks for the detail. It is supposed to rain here in SO Cal this weekend :( , so it's off to the hardware store to build one of these... :D :D
A gate latch, who'd a thunk?? :wonderlan

Renegadez
20th August 2006, 01:43
This R0Xz!

dieselvette
9th September 2006, 23:47
You only need the contraption once - see my solution for fork stem cap R&R in the "fork oil recommendations" post. (I haven't figured out how to put the link in here). There are lots of ideas out there for how to get the caps back on, I say how about just don't take them off? (you'll get it when you read the post)

el jeffe
9th July 2007, 15:31
And use your third hand to snap the camera shutter release ; ,)

Urrell
9th July 2007, 16:00
What's the problem with using the socket in a speedbrace with an extension if needed to miss the bars.
One hand pushes down and guides while the other turns the brace.
It's so simple I may be missing something here
:tour

HacksawsGarage
27th July 2007, 07:03
how can yopu compress the fork springs with a tool, when the tool would have to remain inside the forks tube when the cap goes on it. ???

HacksawsGarage
27th July 2007, 07:06
how do you get the tool off the spring when the cap is placed? the tool cant stay inside the tube!

please send me a pic of this. thanks.

Urrell
16th September 2007, 16:04
how can yopu compress the fork springs with a tool, when the tool would have to remain inside the forks tube when the cap goes on it. ???

The flat on the grip end presses on the cap nut. The other end clamps round the fork leg. After clamping round the leg the tool is used to compress the spring to bring the cap to the threads on the fork leg. The cap is then turned with fingers or a spanner until it is on enough to remove the clamp. It is all external so nothing enters the leg.
:tour :tour :tour :tour :tour :tour :tour :tour :tour :tour

whittlebeast
28th September 2007, 04:28
Thanks to thunderpaw, this is the tool I came up with. The hook is right from the local Walmart. No pain fork cap install with one person even with an additional 1/2" of preload. The wire tie keeps the push down piece with a 1/2 circle notch from jumping off the socket.

There is no need to change the stock front springs out on the 1200 Low bikes as all the front end needs is 1 oz of extra oil on eack side and an added 1/2 inch of preload. The preload spacer was made with 2 - 1/4" thick fairly tough (UHMW) plastic.

AW
http://www.ncs-stl.com/motorcycle/ForkComp1.jpg
http://www.ncs-stl.com/motorcycle/ForkComp2.jpg

rottenralph
28th September 2007, 04:40
I just did it with my hand and a socket. I wonder if I am really strong or if you guys are wimps.

XLXR
28th September 2007, 07:34
I just did it with my hand and a socket. I wonder if I am really strong or if you guys are wimps.

Try it with an 07 Nightster and then come back and call me a wimp. I had to have 2 girls help me with the Nightster. I have now made a fork spring compressor tool. On my Roadster, no problem. Nightster, you better have two girls or the spring compressor tool.

Sportster1200
28th September 2007, 08:28
I am a fairly big guy and with the preload on my springs you have to push very hard and risk damaging something when you are pushing.

A tool that makes things easier is a good thing especially if you have some minor handicap that adds to the difficulty.

KongBastard

Sportster1200
28th September 2007, 08:36
You only need the contraption once - see my solution for fork stem cap R&R in the "fork oil recommendations" post. (I haven't figured out how to put the link in here). There are lots of ideas out there for how to get the caps back on, I say how about just don't take them off? (you'll get it when you read the post)


I would like to see you rebuild your front end or replace your fork seals or springs without taking off the caps. This was basically the reason for the thread as well as the warning in case you weren't expecting it.

I don't think I will hold my breath waiting for the pictures...

KongBastard

Sportster1200
28th September 2007, 08:37
Another tip - watch out when you take them off.

KongBastard

xena
8th October 2007, 12:51
whittlebeast that is cool for sure,
but a bit oversimplified.
You have the socket, all you needed
was a breaker bar and it's cake from
there.

tdawg
17th April 2009, 11:50
Gotta say, I been struggling for years getting caps back on tubes but not this time!!! Made one of Kim's tools for about $15 and my struggling days are over!!!!!!! thanks Kim!!!!!!!!!!!

thunderpaw
1st May 2009, 14:06
You are most welcome!

Kim

Huladog
5th May 2009, 09:49
.... because you don't have one laying around, may I suggest buying the 40 or 54 inch version so you won't have to build a clamp or hook system to hold onto the fork leg. These E-Z Hold clamps are nice since they have little notches on the "bar" that the "advancing handle" can grab onto, helps with the clamping force to avoid slippage.

I finally got the 54 inch version and it is so long the UPS driver was wondering what the heck this tool was. Anyway, it is so long that the end can rest on the garage floor, the "sliding head" holds on right under the lower end of the fork leg and the "advancing handle" can easily reach over the upper end of the fork tube + socket / ratchet combo.

I ended up using the special fork cap nut socket / ratchet / short fat socket on top of the ratchet to apply the clamping pressure but letting the ratchet spin.

http://www.adjustableclamp.com/3400-imgg.jpg

click for manufacturer site (http://www.adjustableclamp.com/bl-3400.htm)

With all this I FINALLY managed to get the fork caps back onto my 1200N without hurting myself again.

Aloha,
Huladog

thunderpaw
12th May 2009, 01:30
.... because you don't have one laying around, may I suggest buying the 40 or 54 inch version so you won't have to build a clamp or hook system to hold onto the fork leg. These E-Z Hold clamps are nice since they have little notches on the "bar" that the "advancing handle" can grab onto, helps with the clamping force to avoid slippage.

I finally got the 54 inch version and it is so long the UPS driver was wondering what the heck this tool was. Anyway, it is so long that the end can rest on the garage floor, the "sliding head" holds on right under the lower end of the fork leg and the "advancing handle" can easily reach over the upper end of the fork tube + socket / ratchet combo.

I ended up using the special fork cap nut socket / ratchet / short fat socket on top of the ratchet to apply the clamping pressure but letting the ratchet spin.

http://www.adjustableclamp.com/3400-imgg.jpg

click for manufacturer site (http://www.adjustableclamp.com/bl-3400.htm)

With all this I FINALLY managed to get the fork caps back onto my 1200N without hurting myself again.

Aloha,
Huladog

Great idea!

Kim

Tater
8th December 2009, 15:37
Very good point Xena.
Wonder if a "T" bar with an extention would work, maybe even better...
If no "T" bar and you have an old extention laying around weld a cross bar to the top...
You sure could put some down & turn pressure seems like...
Have a good one...Tater...

keelerb
14th January 2010, 23:50
Gotta add my thanks to Xena for the breaker bar technique. I just installed a set of Intiminators in my wife's Nightster today, and I would never have gotten the fork caps on again without this great tip. Many thanks. - Brian

smackie
18th March 2010, 23:48
Thanks to Bert's tireless work, I can finally upload again!

This first shot is of the commercially available Trock fork spring compressor. It sells for between $100-$128:
http://xlforum.net/photopost/data/500/trock_spring_compressor.jpg

This next shot is what I built for $15
http://xlforum.net/photopost/data/500/compressor_on_floor.jpg

Here I am beginning to compress the fork spring:
http://xlforum.net/photopost/data/500/starting_to_compress.jpg

Here is a closeup of starting to compress the spring:
http://xlforum.net/photopost/data/500/start_compression_closeup.jpg

After a few squeezes of the compressor, it looks like this:
http://xlforum.net/photopost/data/500/compressed_closeup.jpg
At this stage, if you had put a little film of grease on the orange pad, you can literally turn the socket with your fingers and screw the fork cap in.
It really is that easy!

This is my $2 equivalent to Progressive Suspension's $35 "Pro Oil Level Tool":
http://xlforum.net/photopost/data/500/fork_oil_tool.jpg

I would be glad to go into detail on what exactly I used, where I got it and how much it cost, if anyone is interested, and/or if it warrants "sticky status". I had wrestled for years, doing just like Xena and others had...forcing the caps/springs into the tubes and trying to simultaneously twist to start the thread...usually turning my palm to hamburger, lol!
Then I saw the Trock tool and the little "light" in my head went off...I just knew I could (read: anybody could) replicate that tool out of cheap, readily available "stuff".

Kim


subscribed to this thread :)

tradarcher
10th July 2010, 13:43
Don't laugh, this worked and I didn't even have to go to the hardware store. Sorry 39mm guys, won't work for you.

http://www.stacgang.org/tradarcher/forkcaps.jpg

coolcat2002
3rd April 2012, 18:20
I added an extra 1.5" spring to the stock spring to add a little preload. Hopefully it will help with the nose dives during breaking. The extra spring I cannibalize from a 1984 41mm (same size spring as our 39mm tubes) sticks out further of course and made it much harder to put on. I bought this electric impact wrench for use on sprockets but it works well on our forks too because you can put your shoulder behind it. I then tightened with a regular ratchet. I was scared at first because it could cross thread but no problems here and it took like 2 seconds.
http://i189.photobucket.com/albums/z262/coolcat2002/IMG_0271.jpg

sportysrock
3rd April 2012, 19:40
I would never use a power tool when starting the fork cap.

Deacon Dan
3rd April 2012, 20:43
Lol. I guess bubbahog doesn't know I've got a big L shaped, rainbow striped horn protruding from the top of my head. ;)

Any other special features that would be attractive to an active imagination.

Gcram399
3rd April 2012, 21:54
I installed Progressive springs in my Hugger and used Zena's method with the breaker bar. very easy. Thanks Zena.

07XL1200N
12th May 2012, 04:44
I will try this method for the intimidators.

oldboy
13th July 2012, 14:13
I found a variation on Xena's method that worked for my bike. I tried the breaker bar but was not getting the cap to thread. The height where I was holding on to the bar was too high above the forks to give me the leverage I needed, imo. I also have limited 'range of motion' in both shoulders that might be why the breaker bar method didn't work.

I decieded to use an extension on the socket instead of the breaker bar. This gave me greater control but I still had a problem. I could get the cap down the fork, but I didn't have enough grip on the extention to turn and start the threads. When I tried turning the socket, I was fighting holding onto the extension.

My solution was to slide a large deep well socket over the end of the extension. This gave me a larger diameter to hold onto (making holding the cap down MUCH easier). Then with my other hand I turned the socket and cap.

http://i1237.photobucket.com/albums/ff480/nocollars/P5190005.jpg[/IMG]"] ("http://i1237.photobucket.com/albums/ff480/nocollars/P5190006.jpg

sportysrock
13th July 2012, 15:55
Great idea! Now you have something solid to push done with, but still free to rotate.

Sent using Tapatalk

MindfulRider
13th July 2012, 18:45
Thanks for the great tip!

knut
13th July 2012, 19:08
My solution was to slide a large deep well socket over the end of the extension. This gave me a larger diameter to hold onto (making holding the cap down MUCH easier). Then with my other hand I turned the socket and cap.

Good idea. Having varying lengths of steel pipe to use as extensions on breaker bars, socket wrenches, and open end wrenches makes a helpful addition to any tool box/chest.

Never had any difficulty putting on fork caps myself... but fascinating reading the different solutions people come up with...

simeli
26th September 2012, 12:31
Some wonderful Ideas and because I am getting old I will be building one of the clamp deals.

I have always used a sliding tee bar and an extension with the pin wrench for most tubes. But the newer bikes 73 and up have to have the nut screwed in on the spring which the tee bar and socket let's you put all of your weight on it, but why fight with the things if you don't have to.

+1 I like the clamp idea!

vvosen
7th February 2014, 20:08
Alright. For what it is worth. Position the cap on the fork with no spring and find where the threads catch. Mark fork tube and cap with grease pencil or tape. Then use any method above and turn it 1/4 turn to catch the threads and away you go. Did it with Zena's technique myself. I do like all the other devices too.