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jrevans122
25th February 2007, 03:35
I want to ride tomorrow but I need to change the fluid in the tranny on an
2004 1200R and I'd like to know an equivalent since there won't be any stores open tomorrow that carry the HD Sport Trans fluid. What would be a good equivalent that hopefully could be purchased at an auto supply store or Walmart?

sportysrock
25th February 2007, 17:01
Ride it another day and then change it. Sport Trans is phased out for the newer FORMULA+ Transmission and Primary Chaincase Lubricant. AMSOIL MCV 20W-50 works for that application, and Mobil 1 V-Twin probably works too. Some people have used ATF, but I don't know if they used Mercon, F-Type, or what.

Whatever you use should be wet clutch compatible - with no friction modifiers.

Edit:
Here's info from the MCV product page:
Contains special anti-rust agents for suprior rust protection, and contains no friction modifiers for excellent wet clutch performance. Not recommended for shaft drive hypoid gears or where an API-GL-4 or GL-5 gear oil is required. Performance specifications include: API SG, SL/CF; JASO MA/MA2; API GL-1

I didn't see the specs for Formula+ at HD's website, but a fluid with API specs like AMSOIL MCV should work.

Wizzard Of Odds
26th February 2007, 02:25
Mobil 1 75-90 gear oil works like a champ in the primary, and you can find it at any Autozone or similar store.

sspeer
26th February 2007, 02:30
ditto on the M1 gear oil. I had good luck with it this past year

jrevans122
27th February 2007, 03:19
Thanks Sportysrock,

I headed out the door yesterday to buy Amsoil 20/50 but instead of driving 20 miles one way to get it I settled for the nearest auto parts store to get Mobil 1 20/50 Vtwin fully synthetic. It said that it was compatible with wet clutches and rated just a little lower than Amsoil. I replaced the fluid with the Mobil 1 and went for a 40 mile ride. It seemed to shift a little smoother. I'll try it for a while then possibly switch when I hit the 5000 mike mark.

sspeer
27th February 2007, 03:22
20w50 oil is very close in thickness to 75w90 gear oil. just a different scale for engine and gear oils

68B_Body
20th March 2007, 01:22
so i can use 20w50 engine oil i use in my bike can be used in the primary case? or any 75w90 gear oil like i use in car/truck differentials?

opiate9680
20th March 2007, 02:10
so i can use 20w50 engine oil i use in my bike can be used in the primary case? or any 75w90 gear oil like i use in car/truck differentials?

You can use the engine oil in your primary as long as there are no friction modifiers like Moly, "SUPPOSEDLY". Its speculated that Moly is responsible for premature clutch burnout or something. Same goes for the 75w90 gear oil, though i've only heard of people using Mobil 1 75w90 gear oil but with great success. But NEVER EVER EVER use gear oil as engine oil, something about the sulfur content mixing w/ combustion byproducts causing the equivalent of a nuclear war within your engine.

If you end up using something besides Mobil 1 75w90 gear oil in your bike let me know. I've been considering using valvoline or some other dino gear oil with the same weight in my tranny but am too chicken to try it myself:D

68B_Body
20th March 2007, 02:26
i just use the no synthetic hd oil in my bike and the cheap generic gear oil for my cars and trucks

opiewontaylor
20th March 2007, 04:21
I actually went back to Harley's Formula + from Mobil 1's 75w90 gear oil. I thought it shifted fine with Mobil 1, but I was occasionally getting that "second clunk" when taking off, like the bike wasn't totally into 1st gear. Had the local stealer check out the clutch pack, front sprocket..etc. Could not find anything wrong, so he suggested switching back. Haven't had a second clunk since. (Not knocking Mobil 1, it could be my own fumble footed shiting technique)

Shark Doctor
20th March 2007, 04:28
I want to ride tomorrow but I need to change the fluid in the tranny on an 2004 1200R and I'd like to know an equivalent since there won't be any stores open tomorrow that carry the HD Sport Trans fluid. What would be a good equivalent that hopefully could be purchased at an auto supply store or Walmart?
My dealer laid in a huge stock of Sport Trans before it was to be phased out. I bought a bunch and, surprisingly, he STILL has stock. With every visit, I pick up 2 or 3 more quarts. Perhaps it's just my personal experience, but I have no problems with shifting or the traditional "Sporty Clunk" when I use Sport Trans, problems I encountered with Syn 3 and Mobil 1 gear oil. I'm sure all of our experiences and preferences vary, but for those who prefer the original, I guess there are still places that carry some residual stock, though I'm sure (as other threads have pointed out) that it won't be available for long.

gusotto
20th March 2007, 04:33
Why not just have some around the garage for future changes?
It's only a quart of oil. Buy some in advance and you don't have to worry.

There are plenty of oils made for Sportster tranny/primary application.
SportTrans (still can find it at some dealers), Harley Formula+, Spectro www.spectro-oils.com makes tranny/primary oil just for Sportsters. Same with RevTech. They are labeled FOR Sportsters. AMSOil 20W50 works also.

Just buy your oils ahead of time and you don't have to ask.
A person should always have extra oil.

smackie
26th March 2007, 07:45
agreed i have 6 quarts of amsoil floating around with only about 600 miles since my last change

biknut
26th March 2007, 07:53
(Not knocking Mobil 1, it could be my own fumble footed shiting technique)

I think I see the problem here. A bad shiting technique will cause a clunk every time, and sometimes a plop. :)

JeePing
8th April 2007, 17:11
I actually went back to Harley's Formula + from Mobil 1's 75w90 gear oil. I thought it shifted fine with Mobil 1, but I was occasionally getting that "second clunk" when taking off, like the bike wasn't totally into 1st gear. Had the local stealer check out the clutch pack, front sprocket..etc. Could not find anything wrong, so he suggested switching back. Haven't had a second clunk since. (Not knocking Mobil 1, it could be my own fumble footed shiting technique)

I had same problem with my sporty when I first got it. Changed to M1 75-90 and it stopped.

opiewontaylor
8th April 2007, 23:28
I think I see the problem here. A bad shiting technique will cause a clunk every time, and sometimes a plop. :)

LOL...yep...and a bad typo can sure change the meaning. After all that, it turned out not to be the lubricant anyway ..the primary chain was too tight. (I'm referring to the bike.. of course)

marcel
9th April 2007, 23:49
Mobil1 75-90 or any other (fosil or synthetic) gear oil of the same viscosity that was made for limited slip differentials (differentials with clutches) will work. Gear oils resist higher pressures (stay put between meshing gears) than motor oils. 75-90 gear oils are about the same viscosity as 20w-50 motor oils (just don't use gear oils in engines because the sulfur additives will react with the water by-product of the combustion process to create sulfuric acid!!!).

TrueThumpHD1250
12th April 2007, 08:44
Bardall makes a gear and chaincase lube, thats what i use.

XLFREAK
19th June 2007, 01:57
I drainewd my primary by mistake so I had to find something local to fill it with . My local and trusted M/C mechanic stated he uses the Syn three Harley 20/50 weight all the time .

I have about 500 miles so far and no troubles but it seems to clunk when downshifting more or maybe I am hearing things . I also adjusted my chain according to my owners manual . Could it be a smidge to tight ?

Yes I drained the primary before I read my Harley owners manual . I figure at this rate in 6-8 years I will have all this crap figured out .

JayFL459
25th November 2007, 15:29
Had my Best Luck with Formula+ but don't think will ever totally do away with some 1st Gear Clunk when cold and the first time engaged, have found however hold the clutch in a few seconds makes that 1st morning clunk more acceptable..

xllent01
25th November 2007, 16:01
A little clunk is normal,:)

alot , well is not, just need to quite pussy footing around the gear lever and practice using a firm foot when going into gear.:tour


Been using M1 V-twin 20-50w in both primary and oil bag for many years without a single issue, just need to maintain proper chain adjustment in primary.

Don Burton
25th November 2007, 18:13
Mobil1 75-90 or any other (fosil or synthetic) gear oil of the same viscosity that was made for limited slip differentials (differentials with clutches) will work. Gear oils resist higher pressures (stay put between meshing gears) than motor oils. 75-90 gear oils are about the same viscosity as 20w-50 motor oils (just don't use gear oils in engines because the sulfur additives will react with the water by-product of the combustion process to create sulfuric acid!!!).

I disagree. I would not use any 75W90 gear oil that has friction modifiers made for limited slip applications. Redline makes a 75W90 NS which does not contain these modifiers. However, I've been told that most GL5 gear oil contains a high amount of sulfur which may destroy the stator in your charging system over time. As a result, I wouldn't use any 75W90 gear oil it unless it is specifically recommended by the manufacturer of the lube for this application. It's too bad that the MOCO has not detailed the performance characteristics of Formula +. If synthetic motor oil is better, I'd like to use it, but it also has additives that are designed for internal combustion engines that do not benefit gearboxes. Formula + is a question mark for sure but I haven't heard any specific evidence that Sport Tran somehow has more appropriate properties. It may be the other way around. :)

SCAGNETTI
25th November 2007, 18:59
I Would Also Reccomend Formula + , But You Can Also Run Syn3 In The Prim/trans Also. That Is Why Harley Devised It. One Fluid That Can Be Carried On Trips To Cover All The Of The Components. I Have Personally Found That Formula + Works Better Than Syn3 In The Primary/trans. I Would Have To Change The Syn3 Twice As Much Than The Formula+. My Opinion Is That Syn3 Is Too Light Of A Weight For A Gear Box.

Don Burton
27th November 2007, 10:45
I Have Personally Found That Formula + Works Better Than Syn3 In The Primary/trans. I Would Have To Change The Syn3 Twice As Much Than The Formula+. My Opinion Is That Syn3 Is Too Light Of A Weight For A Gear Box.

I'm curious about the performance differences that you noticed between Syn 3 and Formula +. What was happening that made you want to change the Syn 3 more frequently? Gearbox lube doesn't usually degrade a great deal, its just that it gets contaminated with friction particles from the clutch as well as with some small metallic particles and even moisture over time. I wonder what was happening with your bike?

Syn 3 20W50 motor oil is the approximate equivalent viscocity of 75W90 gear oil, which is rated on a different scale, so it's not too light for our gearboxes. Just by looking at it, and not by specific analysis, Formula + would appear to be about the same weight as well. :)

pbudrovic
26th December 2007, 20:13
I use hd oil for my sportster. So far so good, but like Opiewontaylor wrote "I was occasionally getting that "second clunk" when taking off, like the bike wasn't totally into 1st gear".

dave76
10th July 2008, 04:17
Just a note but my Yamaha Quad like most Jap bikes have the engine and tranny all in one case and use the motor oil through out the engine, clutch an all.

05sporty
2nd August 2008, 04:01
I like to use amsoil 75w140 severe duty gear lube in the trans it works very well . trans shifts very smooth.:wonderlan:wonderlan

Don Burton
3rd August 2008, 05:18
Some of us feel that the 06 on gearboxes have a different sound and feel when shifting which initially left us scratching our heads. When figuring out why this is the case I noted that the 06 on helical cut gear gearboxes have a whole different and lighter sliding dog ring arrangement as compared to the 05 and before gearboxes which have straight cut gears that slide with the engagement dogs mounted right on the end of the sliding gears. The 05 and before arrangement moves more mass when shifting and in my experience that design seems to have a more low pitched clunk while the newer 06 on gearboxes have a sharper and higher pitched noise as only the much lighter sliding dog rings (which are splined to the shaft) are moved or slid along the shaft. There are no synchronizers in either of these designs so there will usually be some sort of clunk or noise when shifting.

It might also help to understand that both of these designs are constant mesh gearboxes so the gears are always meshed and cannot grind when shifting. Even the sliding straight cut gears with the engagement dogs right on them are always meshed (but not always engaged by the dogs). The sliding straight cut gears just have to be a lot wider to remain in mesh when the gears and dogs for that gearset are slid out of engagement. The gears on the newer helical cut gear gearboxes never slide at all (just the lighter sliding dog rings themselves do) and it would seem impossible to create a design that would allow helical cut gears to slide in order to engage or disengage the dogs in the same manner that the straight cut gears do. In either design there is never any grinding of these constantly meshed gears when shifting, it's just the noise of the engagement dog rings or gears with dogs engaging.

RGlaz
13th August 2008, 04:45
In another thread I was told :

"By the way, the tech recommends using the Redline automotive gear oil on the Sporty primary side, as he feels the Redline motorcycle primary gear oil (which is made for big twins with three, not two, oil reservoirs) may cause the Sporty clutch to slip. He tells me their motorcycle primary oil is made for the big twin primary reservoir only"


I get confused by all the claims and thought that I had done my homework.

On the Bottle of Red Line full synthetic V twin primary case oil it says " is designed for 84 to present big twin style motorcycle engines and aftermarket engines of similar designs. this product is for use in the primary chain case with a wet- diaphram spring clutch " It satisfies gear oil viscosity requirements of 70 W 75W and 80 W also SAE 30 10W-30 and 5-30 motor oil viscosities."

The oil pours nicely like synthetics not like the Harley primary Oil which is thicker. Synthetics of all types seem to have this pouring difference.

SO if the tech is saying that I should use gear oil then that would be bad for the clutch but good for the gears?

The BIG difference is that when the bike is dead cold it shifts just like it did with the Harley fluid in it when it is hot. There appears to be NO difference in the shifting when it is hot or cold. I changed over after the 1000 mile and the primary was adjsuted by the dealer. ( yeah I just dumped the fluids after 200 miles) I did this to see the difference in the shifting after the adjustment and be able to see the difference that the OIL makes.

Am I doing wrong by using this ?

RGlaz
27th August 2008, 05:24
I switched to the Red Line 75W90ns oil which doesnot have friction modifiers. So far I am satisfied with the shifting and the clutch operation is fine. It is smoother than the primary oil . The Red Line tech recommended the 75W90 oil but agreed that the 75W90 ns would work.

cantolina
27th August 2008, 05:54
I want to ride tomorrow but I need to change the fluid in the tranny on an
2004 1200R and I'd like to know an equivalent since there won't be any stores open tomorrow that carry the HD Sport Trans fluid. What would be a good equivalent that hopefully could be purchased at an auto supply store or Walmart?

I have 2 suggestions...

First- Redline 20w50, if you can find it...

Second- Valvoline 20w50 motorcycle oil...available almost anywhere....

http://www.valvoline.com/pages/products/product_detail.asp?product=76

biknut
27th August 2008, 06:06
I have 2 suggestions...

First- Redline 20w50, if you can find it...

Second- Valvoline 20w50 motorcycle oil...available almost anywhere....

http://www.valvoline.com/pages/products/product_detail.asp?product=76

I'm sure Red Line 20w50 works great. I love the stuff in my bike, but the Red Line factory recommends their 75w90 gear lube. That's what I've been using for the last 60,000 miles.

Hopper
27th August 2008, 07:07
I have been using BelRay 85w Gearsaver motorcycle gear oil. Looks and smells like ATF, only a little heavier than the Dexron ATF I use in my Toyota.
The BelRay shifts nice and smooth and the clutch is not as grabby as with the HD Formua Plus.

klinesamuel
28th August 2008, 01:42
Two weeks ago I filled the primary with Bel-rays "Sport" fluid. This is made specifically for the Sportster Primary and is in my opinion the greatest thing since sliced bread.
I just installed a new Energy One clutch and was using the recommended Trickshift oil and I was having trouble with my clutch squealing (slipping) when taking off from a dead stop, especially on a hill. Also when it would slip I could smell the clutch burning.
My Primary also was very loud and I was starting to think I broke something in the tranny. Well I had already had ordered some of this Bel-ray oil from Dennis Kirk when all this started happening so I decided to dump the Trickshift and to put some of this in.
After I poured in the new fluid I started the bike and it sounded real quiet where just before I thought my Primary was going to explode. I took the bike out for a test ride and where before it would slam into gear or worse make a grinding noise it now makes a click, click sound going into gear.
Thank you, thank you, thank you Bel-ray. Your "Sport" primary fluid is the only oil I will now use. I never thought just changing the oil would make such a huge difference but it did.

Sam in York

Willie D
7th September 2008, 17:24
I switched to the Rotella 80-90 gear lube, and what a difference it made, smoother shifts, much easier to find neutral, and over all a better viscosity for the trany. feels more like the old 'sport' trans fluid. not near as $$$ as the M1 stuff and I don't mind changing it every 5K even if the book says 10K. Use M1 15w50 in the engine with no side effects.
JM.02

Coolride
2nd March 2009, 01:04
I've been using Diesel CI oil in my Cummins ,and my Honda Vtwin for years .That's what I'm going to use it in my 883,that C classification (commercial)means it withstands extreme heat and valve train pressure like those in diesels, and that's probably why HD states you can use it too, plus it's cheap.:banana

metanurb22
11th March 2009, 04:02
Anyone ever try using Lucas 80w90 gear oil?

rocketmangb
11th March 2009, 17:44
I've been using Diesel CI oil in my Cummins ,and my Honda Vtwin for years .That's what I'm going to use it in my 883,that C classification (commercial)means it withstands extreme heat and valve train pressure like those in diesels, and that's probably why HD states you can use it too, plus it's cheap.:banana

The CI does not stand for commercial !

It stands for Compression as in ignition !

scotty-j
11th March 2009, 18:20
i use Spectro, they too make one specificly for sporty primaries

http://www.spectro-oils.com/products/transmission/hdchaincase.asp?products=cruiser

http://www.spectro-oils.com/images/products/medium/transmission/hdchaincase.jpg

their tech sheet http://www.spectro-oils.com/pdfs/techsheets/HD%20Primary%20Chaincase.pdf

"Heavy Duty Primary Chaincase Oil
This sheer stable petroleum is designed to withstand the punishment of high loads, and contains special polymers to provide exceptional clutch engagement and temperature stability. Meets full OEM requirements, and should be used according to manufacturer’s instructions. Formulated specifically for Harley® Sportster and Big Twin applications. Low drag, low friction loss SAE 85w viscosity eliminates clutch “drag” and slipping."

Don Burton
12th March 2009, 03:18
As a matter of information, Spectro says that their Primary Chain Case oil viscosity is equivalent to an 85W gear oil or a 10W/40 motor oil, both of which use different viscosity scales. This morning I did a feel comparison (not very scientific) between Amsoil 20W/50 motorcycle motor oil and H-D Formula + chain case and gear box lube and the Formula + "felt" at least as thick if not slightly thicker than the Amsoil 20W/50 motor oil.

Don Burton
12th March 2009, 03:26
I switched to the Rotella 80-90 gear lube, and what a difference it made, smoother shifts, much easier to find neutral, and over all a better viscosity for the trany. feels more like the old 'sport' trans fluid. not near as $$$ as the M1 stuff and I don't mind changing it every 5K even if the book says 10K. Use M1 15w50 in the engine with no side effects.
JM.02

I'm curious as to what you mean by the term "better viscosity." Do you want thinner or thicker than Sport Tran, Formula + or Syn-3? That 80W/90 gear oil may not be any thicker or more viscous (could be slightly thinner) than H-D Formula + or H-D Syn-3 20W/50 motor oil. Also, one can buy Sport Tran fluid where I live (tons of it still around) for a couple of dollars less than the newer Formula + but I won't use it in my 06 bike as it was never specd for the newer helical cut gear gearbox. I don't know what it's properties are and it just isn't worth my time to check in order to save a couple of dollars every couple of years.

64Iron
26th April 2009, 23:45
I hope this is not a dumb question but, is Lucas hub oil ok to use in the primary??

bigjnsa
27th April 2009, 00:09
Just an observation here... I switched to Amsoil 20/50 in the primary approximately 3.5k ago. I find neutral is harder to find now and I have to constantly adjust my clutch. It doesn't slip (even under WOT), but its going OUT more on the lever than before. Now it seems I have to adjust it every 1k. I am beginning to wonder if its the oil or the clutch is finally wearing out.

Don Burton
27th April 2009, 04:54
I disagree. I would not use any 75W90 gear oil that has friction modifiers made for limited slip applications. Redline makes a 75W90 NS which does not contain these modifiers. However, I've been told that most GL5 gear oil contains a high amount of sulfur which may destroy the stator in your charging system over time. As a result, I wouldn't use any 75W90 gear oil it unless it is specifically recommended by the manufacturer of the lube for this application. It's too bad that the MOCO has not detailed the performance characteristics of Formula +.

I must correct myself in that in my recent multiple e-mail conversations with a Redline Rep, I learned that Redline specifically recommends their regular GL5 75/W/90 gear oil for use in our Sportster gearboxes/clutch cases. I was also told that both their 75W/90 NS and MT 90 were acceptable while not specfically recommended. I was told that their regular 75W/90 doesn't have enough friction modifiers to adversely affect our clutches while they could be beneficial to our constant mesh gearboxes. I was also told that it's EP additives will not adversely affect any brass or copper components in our charging systems.

robvas
29th April 2009, 15:50
Second- Valvoline 20w50 motorcycle oil...available almost anywhere....

http://www.valvoline.com/pages/products/product_detail.asp?product=76

I picked some of this up for $2.99 a quart at AutoZone last weekend. I should have bought a whole case!

johnwestphal
18th May 2009, 02:45
The Valvoline 75/90 gear oil works real well. Adjusted the Primary Chain using the "Hero Method" at the same time. Shifts from 1st to 2nd smoother now. Was getting a "missed" shift here/there under hard acceleration.

cantolina
18th May 2009, 02:52
The CI does not stand for commercial !

It stands for Compression as in ignition !

CI, as an API service mark, does, in fact, stand for "commercial"

http://www.apicj-4.org/EngineOilGuide2006.pdf

CI-4 is the current standard...

shilohsam
4th December 2009, 18:05
Some of us feel that the 06 on gearboxes have a different sound and feel when shifting which initially left us scratching our heads. When figuring out why this is the case I noted that the 06 on helical cut gear gearboxes have a whole different and lighter sliding dog ring arrangement as compared to the 05 and before gearboxes which have straight cut gears that slide with the engagement dogs mounted right on the end of the sliding gears. The 05 and before arrangement moves more mass when shifting and in my experience that design seems to have a more low pitched clunk while the newer 06 on gearboxes have a sharper and higher pitched noise as only the much lighter sliding dog rings (which are splined to the shaft) are moved or slid along the shaft. There are no synchronizers in either of these designs so there will usually be some sort of clunk or noise when shifting.

It might also help to understand that both of these designs are constant mesh gearboxes so the gears are always meshed and cannot grind when shifting. Even the sliding straight cut gears with the engagement dogs right on them are always meshed (but not always engaged by the dogs). The sliding straight cut gears just have to be a lot wider to remain in mesh when the gears and dogs for that gearset are slid out of engagement. The gears on the newer helical cut gear gearboxes never slide at all (just the lighter sliding dog rings themselves do) and it would seem impossible to create a design that would allow helical cut gears to slide in order to engage or disengage the dogs in the same manner that the straight cut gears do. In either design there is never any grinding of these constantly meshed gears when shifting, it's just the noise of the engagement dog rings or gears with dogs engaging.

Don
Appreciated your information on the gearbox differences between the older design and 2006 and up.
I have owned many different motorcycles BSA ,BMW, GUZZI, all of the main four JAP. makes. I have found my 2008 1200R Sportser's gearbox to be as good or better as any of the others.
One curious thing that is different about my Sportster gearbox is that the shift I am most likely to get a clunk from is the second to third shift. All other motorcycles I have owned had the clunk or noisy shift on the first to second shift. Usually there is the greatest ratio change between first and second.
On the Sportster using just a small amount of preload on the shifter I can get very smooth and silent shifts on all changes except from the second to third shift. I have not looked closely at the gearbox design yet but no doubt there is more mass of parts involved in this shift than the others.
Any insight?

P.S. The 1968 BSA Thunderbolt listed above had a great gearbox, very smooth shifting. It had a shifting cam plate instead of the shifting drum and was typical of many British gearboxs. But then it was only a 650cc and did not require the heavy gears of a larger more powerful engine. I wish I had keep that one.

bcoons
4th December 2009, 19:03
The older ironhead Sportsters used engine oil in the Trans/primary until H-D came out with Sport-Trans fluid for '71 and later XL's. I like Sport-Trans fluid but H-D replaced it with Formula+ as someone stated. I don't know as much about the Formula+ except that I use it in the newer Harleys. CCI produced an oil that is the equivalent of the old Sport-Trans fluid and I believe last I looked it was still available from them. bc

Don Burton
5th December 2009, 04:58
Don
Appreciated your information on the gearbox differences between the older design and 2006 and up.
I have owned many different motorcycles BSA ,BMW, GUZZI, all of the main four JAP. makes. I have found my 2008 1200R Sportser's gearbox to be as good or better as any of the others.
One curious thing that is different about my Sportster gearbox is that the shift I am most likely to get a clunk from is the second to third shift. All other motorcycles I have owned had the clunk or noisy shift on the first to second shift. Usually there is the greatest ratio change between first and second.
On the Sportster using just a small amount of preload on the shifter I can get very smooth and silent shifts on all changes except from the second to third shift. I have not looked closely at the gearbox design yet but no doubt there is more mass of parts involved in this shift than the others.
Any insight?

P.S. The 1968 BSA Thunderbolt listed above had a great gearbox, very smooth shifting. It had a shifting cam plate instead of the shifting drum and was typical of many British gearboxs. But then it was only a 650cc and did not require the heavy gears of a larger more powerful engine. I wish I had keep that one.

My gearbox makes the most noise shifting into third gear as well. Different levels of gearbox lube and primary chain adjustments don't seem to make any difference in the sound. I don't have any idea why shifting into third gear makes more noise than the others.

Yes, the BSA's and Triumphs of the 60s and 70s had great shifting gearboxes and they never crunched except for sometimes when punching them into first, especially when cold.

shilohsam
5th December 2009, 19:25
My gearbox makes the most noise shifting into third gear as well. Different levels of gearbox lube and primary chain adjustments don't seem to make any difference in the sound. I don't have any idea why shifting into third gear makes more noise than the others.

Yes, the BSA's and Triumphs of the 60s and 70s had great shifting gearboxes and they never crunched except for sometimes when punching them into first, especially when cold.

I remember that also, however because the kick starter did not operate using the clutch primary but by the transmission input shaft ,before starting after is had sat overnight or longer I would put it in gear, pull in the clutch and break the clutch plates loose with a stroke of the kick starter .

Don Burton
6th December 2009, 01:11
Sure! I did the same thing to break the clutch loose but am I correct in remembering that the Triumphs had to be in neutral to do that (or you might otherwise be going for an unplanned ride) or is my memory faulty? I owned several Triumphs during the early to mid 1970s. What great bikes on the twisty, hilly roads of rural New England!