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dlo883
25th April 2007, 01:34
Hey all.
Yet another question for the forum guru's. Anyone ever seen or heard of a stripped bleeder valve? :frownthre Wanted to hook up the mityvac to change the front brake fluid after changing the disc and pads and after the 1st turn, the valve stripped. :censor Anyone know how to fix this? Do I need a new caliper or can I drain the fluid and drill it out???
Safe Riding

Dave
Johnston, RI

melcheld
25th April 2007, 01:42
Well, I can't say whether or not you can get a larger bleeder and retap the threads. I'm fairly sure that you'd want to pull the caliper apart and clean it to be sure no metal shards from the striped threads found their way inside.

Luke

dlo883
25th April 2007, 02:24
sorry, i meant to say that it never turned to open up, it was so tight that it stripped while trying to open it to bleed them.

davidcar
25th April 2007, 02:31
Did the thread strip or did you break off the protruding section?

sorry, i meant to say that it never turned to open up, it was so tight that it stripped while trying to open it to bleed them.

rottenralph
25th April 2007, 02:31
Did it break off or is it stripped. If stripped, get a bigass pair of vicegrips and it will come off. If it is broken, I have found that cutting a drill toi drill in the reverse directing will sometimes screw it right back out. Take you time drilling. if you step up the drill size you might be able to get it out without damaging anything.

decman
25th April 2007, 03:33
They make repair kits for that problem.
Go to an auto store for the kit.
You will need a tap for pipe threads.

It happen to mine last year, the kit worked great.

dec

xllent01
25th April 2007, 03:36
They make repair kits for that problem.
Go to an auto store for the kit.
You will need a tap for pipe threads.

It happen to mine last year, the kit worked great.

dec

Yep, just drill it out, tap it and use a Heli-coil kit to fix. :D :D :D

dlo883
25th April 2007, 04:08
the nut part where you put the box wrench to open and close it stripped. the part that the rubber cover goes over, so i'm unable to turn it now. im gonna try vice grips tomorrow. does my local hd stealer or local auto store have replacements?
you guys are great thanks

davidcar
26th April 2007, 07:56
If the vise grips don't hold firm, you can slightly grind two opposite sides flat, so as to create a good surface for grip

SpartanDen
26th April 2007, 13:22
Sounds like you rounded the hex on the "bolt" portion of the bleeder screw. Sometimes you can take a small hammer and lightly tap the top of the bleeder screw...this may help to "shock" the threads a bit and maybe loosen them up a bit. Visegrips and/or grinding flats are good suggestions too.
Let us know how it turns out. Good luck!

Gold951
26th April 2007, 15:18
Bummer. I know this is late advice, but you really need to get a "flare nut wrench".

I'd be willing to bet you that you used either an adjustable wrench (AKA Crescent Hammer), or a standard open end wrench on the bleeder bolt. The wrench slipped and rounded the corners off the the bolt flats. This is VERY common with brake bleeders and brake line fittings. A lot of DIY mechanics will use an adjustable wrench or some other "tool" on brake fittings. They can't get a box end wrench on the fitting because the brake line is in their way.

Flare nut wrenches look just like a standard box end wrenches except the box is slotted so you can get the wrench on brake fitting flare nuts.

FWIW, I doubt you will be able to get the MityVac to work for you. I've tried using one to bleed the brakes on my Porsche, my '03 883, my GF's bikes ('77 Iron Head and '87 Virago), and several other vehicles. The problem is the MityVac just pulls air past the bleeder bolt threads.

Bleeding Sportster brakes can be a real PITA because of how DOT 5 fluid traps air. When "normal" DOT 3 and DOT 4 fluids trap air, the smaller bubbles can migrate and come together to form bigger bubbles that are fairly easy to remove. When DOT 5 fluid traps air, the bubbles have some difficulty migrating, so the bubbles tend to be smaller and there are more of them. Also, when you pressurize a DOT 5 brake system that has trapped air and then let the pressure off, the DOT 5 fluid tends to break the original bubbles into even smaller and smaller bubbles. What you end up with is a brake fluid that has lots of microscopic air bubbles and your brakes feel spongy.

What I've found to be the best way to bleed Sportster brakes is to use the "tickle method":

1. With the bike on a lift or the jiffy stand, turn the front wheel to the LEFT until the front master cylinder is as close to level as possible. Squeeze the brake lever as far as you can and note how the brakes feel and how far the lever moves.
2. Clean the area around the reservoir cap and then remove the cap.
3. Top off with DOT 5 brake fluid.
4. Starting at the front caliper, gently rap the brake line with a screwdriver handle or similar tool, working your way up the brake line.
5. SLOWLY squeeze the brake lever until just start to you feel some resistance.
6. Quickly release the brake lever letting it "snap" against the mechanical stop. You should see small bubbles coming out of the small port in the piston bore.
7. Repeat steps 4 through 6 several times. The size and quantity of bubbles should decrease.
8. SLOWLY squeeze the brake handle as far as you can. Note brake feel and lever travel and then quickly release the brake lever.
9. Repeat steps 4 through 8 as necessary.
10. Top off the master cylinder and install the cover.

I know this sounds like a PITA, but it works.

dlo883
5th May 2007, 00:39
Well, I removed the front caliper and carefully placed it in my bench vice. Vice gripped the valve off, cleaned out the hole with a brush and canned air and replaced the bleeder valve. Works great. Thanks for all your help. And btw, it is DOT5.
Safe riding

Dave
Johnston, RI