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View Full Version : New brake pads -- easy install


Deimus
28th July 2007, 01:08
I've got 17.5k miles on my '05 now. I noticed some wear showing on my rear brake rotor. Upon closer examination, the pads were looking pretty bare. So did a little searching and found a set of pads from an eBay dealer with a good price. It was a complete set front and back for $40 shipped. The part numbers were HD6014 for the front and HD6015 for the rear. They are a semi-metallic Kevlar pad. Searching on these part numbers and I found a description from ETPerformance that sounded good so I ordered them. I just finished the first little ride after installing them on the bike. The install was simple. Only mistake I made was to follow the procedures from the factory manual exactly. I removed the top of the front master cylinder, as instructed, so I could push the caliper pistons back in place. This resulted in a little geyser of fluid because I had to push hard enough to get the caliper to move and once moving it moved quickly enough to squirt the fluid up. Fortunately I have DOT5 fluid which doesn't harm paint so the cleanup was simple. When I got to the rear caliper, I only loosened the top of the master cylinder and there wasn't any mess. Be aware that the caliper pins is metric allan size and not an SAE size.

This is a simple maintenance task to perform, so when it becomes time for brake pads on your ride don't hesitate to change them yourself. Just read and follow the procedures in the manual sans the complete removal of the master cylinder tops and you will avoid the little mess I had. This is especially important to remember if your bike doesn't have DOT5 brake fluid in it.

Casper
28th July 2007, 01:13
Deimus, I fully agree with you on the ease of installation. If you've never done it before, it may look a little daunting, but once you get rolling, you start thinking to yourself "oh, this is all there is to it?".

One thing I found very helpful was the FixMyHog DVD. It gave me a key component that I was previously missing: a visual on how it's done. I watched the brake segment twice, went outside with my MoCo manual, and did it without problem, despite the fact that the DVD used a model with newer brakes. I find that seeing it done before you jump in makes things a lot easier than just reading the Hundred-Dollar manual.

racerwill
28th July 2007, 01:19
agreed with Casper.... seeing it really lets ya see how straight forward simple it is......just reading the book can be a little confusing at times:doh

Ww:smoke

plevine1
3rd August 2007, 04:11
I'm about to do my brakes. I have the Fix My Hog dvd and they didnt open either the front or rear master cyl covers.

Deimus
3rd August 2007, 04:51
I'm about to do my brakes. I have the Fix My Hog dvd and they didnt open either the front or rear master cyl covers.

How did they account for the pressure release when you push the caliper pistons back in place? Opening the master cylinder covers is the method instructed by the factory service manual.

ReddTigger
3rd August 2007, 04:54
I did both front and rear and did NOT open the covers. Didn't need any additional fluid. Bike stops great..

I usually don't open the mc cover on my cars either when I do brakes, unless it's to add/change out fluid. >FWIW<

Deimus
3rd August 2007, 04:58
I did both front and rear and did NOT open the covers. Didn't need any additional fluid. Bike stops great..

I usually don't open the mc cover on my cars either when I do brakes, unless it's to add/change out fluid. >FWIW<

How do you push the pistons back into the calipers? Will the fluid flow back into the master cylinder without opening the cover? If so, why would the factory service manual instruct one to open them?

ReddTigger
3rd August 2007, 05:06
I used a hand held clamp. Similiar to this...

http://www.powertoolsuk.co.uk/webcat/pics/draper%5C31935.jpg

Deimus
3rd August 2007, 05:14
do you have to remove the caliper to use this clamp?

ReddTigger
3rd August 2007, 05:17
I did remove the calipers. I had to replace the pins in the front and I refreshed the pins on the rear.

I've always removed calipers whenever I've done brakes. Just how i do em.

Deimus
3rd August 2007, 05:25
Got it. No special tools are needed if you follow the procedures in the factory service manual and you only need to loosen the master cylinder covers so that the pressure can escape. This procedure is very simple. But whatever works for you is good in the end. :)

Also, removing and inspecting the pins is part of the brake pad replacement so the pins can be replaced without removing the calipers.

ReddTigger
3rd August 2007, 05:31
Got it. No special tools are needed if you follow the procedures in the factory service manual and you only need to loosen the master cylinder covers so that the pressure can escape. This procedure is very simple. But whatever works for you is good in the end. :)

Also, removing and inspecting the pins is part of the brake pad replacement so the pins can be replaced without removing the calipers.

FYI. I don't use any Special Tools, I bought my clamp at odd lots for 2 bucks, and it hangs in the garage. I use it for everything you can imagine you'd need a 1 handed clamp for. It happened to work great on the bike. The FM has a lot of great procedures, but you have to use common sense as well. If not, I'd have drained my primary to take off my heads (as listed in the FM) which doesn't need to be done. Just like taking off my MC covers doesn't need to be done. Especially when you've heard horror stories of the BRAKE FLUID shooting out the the handlebar clamp as you push back in the piston. I've seen it happen.

Deimus
3rd August 2007, 05:45
FYI. I don't use any Special Tools, I bought my clamp at odd lots for 2 bucks, and it hangs in the garage. I use it for everything you can imagine you'd need a 1 handed clamp for. It happened to work great on the bike. The FM has a lot of great procedures, but you have to use common sense as well. If not, I'd have drained my primary to take off my heads (as listed in the FM) which doesn't need to be done. Just like taking off my MC covers doesn't need to be done. Especially when you've heard horror stories of the BRAKE FLUID shooting out the the handlebar clamp as you push back in the piston. I've seen it happen.

Yes, the fluid squirted up with me on the front brakes as I explained in my original post in this thread. That's why on the rear I only loosened the master cylinder cover instead of removing it. It worked perfectly this way. The caliper doesn't have to be removed, no mess is made, no extra fluid is needed, and the entire process takes only a few minutes. This has to be the easiest way to accomplish the task.

Rigpa
3rd August 2007, 05:54
If you haven't checked yet, may want to check the brake disk thickness too... Minimum thickness is on the disk itself and to get an accurate measure you'll need a micrometer. All depends how agressive you ride or brake rather ;) ..worth checking seeing as you're near 20K.

Deimus
3rd August 2007, 06:00
If you haven't checked yet, may want to check the brake disk thickness too... Minimum thickness is on the disk itself and to get an accurate measure you'll need a micrometer. All depends how agressive you ride or brake rather ;) ..worth checking seeing as you're near 20K.

My disc is fine. There are a few small grooves in it but no ridge has been worn where the edge of the pad contact area meets the inner rotor area.

plevine1
4th August 2007, 03:46
Can you tell me the type of bolt used to mount the caliper. It's some type of star bolt but I don't want to use the wrong tool and strip the bolt.

Deimus
4th August 2007, 04:26
Can you tell me the type of bolt used to mount the caliper. It's some type of star bolt but I don't want to use the wrong tool and strip the bolt.

I know the head of the bolt looks strange. But it is actually a "normal" bolt only the socket that fits it is a twelve point 10 millimeter. There is another twelve point on your bike. If you look at your head bolts (beside your sparkplugs), you will find that they are 1/2 inch twelve points. Just pull out your 10mm socket and try it. Even though we normally have hex head bolts (six point), our socket sets are usually twelve point.

sportysrock
4th August 2007, 04:59
Master cylinders are vented to allow air in as the fluid goes down or there would be a vacuum created. You should be able to slowly force the caliper piston back in.

Deimus
4th August 2007, 05:12
Master cylinders are vented to allow air in as the fluid goes down or there would be a vacuum created. You should be able to slowly force the caliper piston back in.

Good point.

I've thought about what possible logic the engineers had in mind when they put together the procedures that are in our factory service manual. I think I know the case they are allowing for. That being, if fluid has been added to the master cylinder to maintain the level at the upper mark. In this case, there would be too much fluid in your system to allow the pistons to be compressed back into the calipers. So this means, if you haven't added any fluid, as was my case with my rear brakes, then your fluid level should be at the lower mark when you go to replace your pads. This means there is room in the master cylinder to allow the fluid to go back to the upper mark as you compress the pistons back into the calipers. However, if you have added fluid then your system will contain too much fluid to allow the pistons to be fully compressed back into the calipers without having that extra amount of fluid removed first. And you need to fully compress the pistons in order to have the room required to fit new pads.

Swankster
29th August 2007, 16:23
[quote=Deimus;832642]I've got 17.5k miles on my '05 now. I noticed some wear showing on my rear brake rotor. Upon closer examination, the pads were looking pretty bare. So did a little searching and found a set of pads from an eBay dealer with a good price. It was a complete set front and back for $40 shipped. The part numbers were HD6014 for the front and HD6015 for the rear. They are a semi-metallic Kevlar pad. Searching on these part numbers and I found a description from ETPerformance that sounded good so I ordered them. I just finished the first little ride after installing them on the bike. The install was simple. Only mistake I made was to follow the procedures from the factory manual exactly. I removed the top of the front master cylinder, as instructed, so I could push the caliper pistons back in place. This resulted in a little geyser of fluid because I had to push hard enough to get the caliper to move and once moving it moved quickly enough to squirt the fluid up. Fortunately I have DOT5 fluid which doesn't harm paint so the cleanup was simple. When I got to the rear caliper, I only loosened the top of the master cylinder and there wasn't any mess. Be aware that the caliper pins is metric allan size and not an SAE size.

Hey, I thought the caliper pin size is 12 point 1/4 inch but you say metric?
I'll have to check as I just bought new pads and will be changing mine out in the next day or so.
Swankster

SpartanDen
29th August 2007, 17:33
Guys... think about this. The brake system is a closed system. As the brake pads wear, the pistons in the calipers move to accomodate this wear. The volume of the area behind the piston is filled with brake fluid. That is to say that the pads do not retract as they wear, the fluid fills the volume behind the piston, and the master cylinder fluid level will decrease. For years I have always taken a large set of channel lock pliers and squeezed the piston back into the caliper. The fluid that is behind the piston just forces itself back into the master brake reservoir. If you ever check your cars brakes, you will see the fluid level decrease as your brake pads wear. If you replace the brake pads and squeeze the pistons back into the caliper...you will see the fluid level rise.
Simply put, when you change your brake pads, gently squeeze the pistons back into the caliper. Then give it a couple of gentle squeezes once you have finished the job to get the pistions back into location. No need to remove the master cylinder cover. No need to drain out any fluid. No need to open the system.

rdgzoe
29th August 2007, 17:38
But brakes though -- that is a big safety item.

Deimus
29th August 2007, 18:19
Guys... think about this. The brake system is a closed system. As the brake pads wear, the pistons in the calipers move to accomodate this wear. The volume of the area behind the piston is filled with brake fluid. That is to say that the pads do not retract as they wear, the fluid fills the volume behind the piston, and the master cylinder fluid level will decrease. For years I have always taken a large set of channel lock pliers and squeezed the piston back into the caliper. The fluid that is behind the piston just forces itself back into the master brake reservoir. If you ever check your cars brakes, you will see the fluid level decrease as your brake pads wear. If you replace the brake pads and squeeze the pistons back into the caliper...you will see the fluid level rise.
Simply put, when you change your brake pads, gently squeeze the pistons back into the caliper. Then give it a couple of gentle squeezes once you have finished the job to get the pistions back into location. No need to remove the master cylinder cover. No need to drain out any fluid. No need to open the system.

I'm sure the factory service manual gives the procedures it does to accomodate the cases where someone has maintained the fluid level at the upper mark. If you've never added any fluid, then you are right.

Swankster
2nd September 2007, 02:10
I changed out my rear pads today with no particular issues or problems. I DID NOT remove or touch the master cylinder and the caliper stayed on the wheel/rotor. I used a large 3 inch "chisel blade" paint scraper and screw driver to push the pad pistons into the caliper. After I removed the pads I cleaned out the area with an air compresor and used the same pins for the new pads. I did rub anti-seize on the pins (not threads). Afterwards, several pushes on the pedal and brakes operating just fine. Good ride followed and that's mt report!
Swankster