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peklucher
6th July 2010, 18:49
just curious as to what type of spark plug you all like/prefer and type and size of plug wire like/prefer to use in your sporty. and why do you prefer it over others.

scooterbe883
6th July 2010, 18:58
personally i run stock plugs/wires since the motor is stock. i guess if it were modified, id run hotter plugs and maybe larger wires...but the stock ones are fine for my application.

perfectidiot
6th July 2010, 19:00
stock plugs/stock wires, no noticeable difference in wires or plugs

rocketmangb
6th July 2010, 19:03
I run Taylor wires in 8 MM because i can get them in Yellow !

I run NGK Iridium spark plugs because im an NGK fan !

merc
6th July 2010, 19:07
I use the plugs from HD but I bought some real cool blue wires at the speed shop to match my bike.

Babalu
6th July 2010, 19:27
i use denso iridium v-rod plugs, they're a bit cooler than the sporty plugs. bike runs well and i haven't fouled one yet.

Rico 05R
6th July 2010, 20:23
I run Scott Performance wires because I can get them in Yellow, and I run Denso Iridiums, because they're good plugs.

Texas_Wild
6th July 2010, 20:33
NGK NGK NGK

I have seen a few metrics cured of poor idling by them and my sporty likes them better too!

khaskins
6th July 2010, 22:46
Denso Iridiums here as well.

XLXR
6th July 2010, 22:59
Magnacor wires with "platinum" plugs, , I have forgotten which specific ones. They do make the engine run a bit smoother when combined with proper jetting, I don't know about more power because I learned tuning long before dyno's became popular.

sonnydaze
6th July 2010, 23:32
accell 8.8 because they are cheap and work good , champion plugs in any air cooled bike

jharback
7th July 2010, 00:29
I use HD plugs because they spark. I use 8mm orange wires because I like the looks.

BWP 5p
7th July 2010, 04:01
Orange wires for the look.....cheap Champions because they work!

steelworker
7th July 2010, 04:51
Magnecor KV85 Competition leads, because they do a fitment for the twin-plug 1200S. and because they're red.

SE plugs for high compression applications, because they work. I recently swapped over the SE plugs that had been in my bike for several years (not because they gave any trouble, but because I thought it was time to change them) and fitted NGK DCPR9E plugs. They failed after a few hundred miles (not fouled - just didn't work), so I went back to the SE plugs. The tech and parts guy at my local dealer both told me they often have problems with customers' bikes fitted with NGK plugs.

xHDrider
7th July 2010, 10:28
Magnecor wires, OEM Champ Harley Plugs. I'm going to try the Denso plugs that NHRS recomends. (IRIDIUM IXU22)

I tried NGK twice they sucked. the idle was lower and the engine was choppy. sounded like the carb was out of adjustment.

the NGKs were new and the Harley plugs had over 7,000 miles on them. I put the old spark plugs back in it ran much better.

maybe if the gap was opened up more on the NGKs it would of helped they were .035 my bike likes .038-.040. but I doubt I'd feel any thing better from the NGKs

Champs have worked good for me in the past too. however NEVER NEVER put them in with a dry thread.

wedge
7th July 2010, 11:56
personally i run stock plugs/wires since the motor is stock. i guess if it were modified, id run hotter plugs and maybe larger wires...but the stock ones are fine for my application.
Plug heat range is an important issue, and it should not be changed arbitrarily to a "hotter" plug. Actually in many aplications, it is a colder plug that is required when you up the compression and get the engine breathing better. There is a carb thread going now that I just posted Plug Reading 101 in. If you look at that it will tell you how to determine the correct heat range of plug.

wedge
7th July 2010, 12:01
NGK NGK NGK

I have seen a few metrics cured of poor idling by them and my sporty likes them better too!
Back when I was tuning circle track carbs (Holly 4412's mostly), we also ran testing on every brand of plug. The NGK plugs were far superior to anything else at the time. Champions were the worst (the center electrode would melt out under a heavy load).

That said, I have not changed to NGK yet, but I intend to do so the next time I change plugs.

xHDrider
12th July 2010, 15:29
My DENSO IRIDIUM IXU22 plugs came today.

I put them in. so far I like them.
The Bike ran better when the engine was cold with the Denso plugs. the champions were in it for 6,000 miles after I took a torch to them, after I fouled them in the cold weather once. (when the engine was an 883)

even in the abused state they worked and made the engine idle better then the NGK spark plugs did.

The denso plugs looked like a quality plug. so far no pinging with them either. they are gapped about .040

TomHunter
12th July 2010, 15:46
I ordered some E3 1 step colder than normal for my heavily modified 1250. They run grate and have 4,000 miles so far.

Tom H

wedge
12th July 2010, 16:06
My DENSO IRIDIUM IXU22 plugs came today.

I put them in. so far I like them.
The Bike ran better when the engine was cold with the Denso plugs. the champions were in it for 6,000 miles after I took a torch to them, after I fouled them in the cold weather once. (when the engine was an 883)

even in the abused state they worked and made the engine idle better then the NGK spark plugs did.

The denso plugs looked like a quality plug. so far no pinging with them either. they are gapped about .040
Did you use the correct NGK plugs, DCPR7E? It sounds like you got some bad plugs or the wrong heat range. Iridium plugs are intended for high RPM engines, so there is no need to run them in a sportster unless you intend to run that beast at 12,000 RPM plus, and replace the crank every week or so. I have a long history with NGK plugs in all my bikes and in circle track cars that I worked on (every weekend for about 6 years), and they were the best plug for the job. Champions like to go into melt down when they get under a load, and the center electrode looks like one of those cones that you put in a pottery oven after it melts over. I am going to go pick up a set of DCPR7E's right now. I'll let you know how they run and how they read after I have had them in for a while.

xHDrider
12th July 2010, 16:51
Did you use the correct NGK plugs, DCPR7E? It sounds like you got some bad plugs or the wrong heat range. Iridium plugs are intended for high RPM engines, so there is no need to run them in a sportster unless you intend to run that beast at 12,000 RPM plus, and replace the crank every week or so. I have a long history with NGK plugs in all my bikes and in circle track cars that I worked on (every weekend for about 6 years), and they were the best plug for the job. Champions like to go into melt down when they get under a load, and the center electrode looks like one of those cones that you put in a pottery oven after it melts over. I am going to go pick up a set of DCPR7E's right now. I'll let you know how they run and how they read after I have had them in for a while.
I'll have to look and see what they were the honda shop crossed my Harley plugs into what ever they were. I may have tossed them.

THE OTHER THING I LIKE ABOUT DENSO the same spark plug sockets fits them I use for the champion plugs. the NGK plugs were a odd size.

I used to run champions in my big block chevys the projected nose plugs worked out well for me. for a cheap plug they have served me well.

in the 70s I was service manager and mechanic in a honda MC for 5 years.
NGKs were all I used in the hondas. in 5 years I got one bad batch of plugs that made the motors miss right out of the box. so I know you can get bad plugs. on a honda 4 cylinder, 1-4 and 2-3 fire together. a bad plug can mess you up real well. sorta like a wasted spark on my sportster ignition.

I'm going to run the denso's for years before I worry about replacing them, the cost is not a problem. my only concern is the small electrode being a hot spot, making my motor ping. so for so good!

Shuckun's
12th July 2010, 18:00
I run the NGK dcpr7e plugs. Stock wires, seem to run ok. No misfiring or fouling out. Throttle up and runs strong, I'm happy.

rocketmangb
12th July 2010, 18:22
I dont really believe the Iridium plugs are strictly for a high RPM engine.

I do believe they will fire easier in poor conditions and out last a copper plug about 5-1

rocketmangb
12th July 2010, 18:25
Hey Wedge !

Shag over here and we can index and put in a set of Iridium 8'S

Then you can tell me what you think !

tpjets62
12th July 2010, 18:55
I run Taylor wires in 8 MM because i can get them in Yellow !

I run NGK Iridium spark plugs because im an NGK fan !

Same here except I got my wires in Red. I have always had good luck with NGK or AC plugs in cars and bikes. Champion plugs always seem to be 50/50 for me, so I dont waste my time.

xHDrider
12th July 2010, 19:27
Hey Wedge I found the NGK's I removed. I ran them for about 10 miles when the bike was a 883 and about a mile as a 1200.
they are NGK DPR7EA
R 9

had a R under the NGK and a 9 under the DPR7EA

I'd just about send them to a NGK lover. if I knew they would keep them in their bike for remission of past sins, I might consider giving them away and sending them for free.

I had to even turn my idle up with these duds they were gaped at a loose .035

I didn't mention I have 200 psi cold cranking compression, that may have been a issue.
(but shouldn't have been a problem)

wedge
13th July 2010, 11:36
I'll have to look and see what they were the honda shop crossed my Harley plugs into what ever they were. I may have tossed them.

THE OTHER THING I LIKE ABOUT DENSO the same spark plug sockets fits them I use for the champion plugs. the NGK plugs were a odd size.

I used to run champions in my big block chevys the projected nose plugs worked out well for me. for a cheap plug they have served me well.

in the 70s I was service manager and mechanic in a honda MC for 5 years.
NGKs were all I used in the hondas. in 5 years I got one bad batch of plugs that made the motors miss right out of the box. so I know you can get bad plugs. on a honda 4 cylinder, 1-4 and 2-3 fire together. a bad plug can mess you up real well. sorta like a wasted spark on my sportster ignition.

I'm going to run the denso's for years before I worry about replacing them, the cost is not a problem. my only concern is the small electrode being a hot spot, making my motor ping. so for so good!

Cool, check out my Honda in my gallery. I have had it since new in 78

I just picked up the NGK's last night and will put them in today. Yes, I have seen bad plugs before too. I can't remember a bad NGK right now, but at the track I sure saw a lot of Champions that were melted down. What's the ford plug? AC Delco? Anyway, the ford plugs were good too in the sportsman cars.

wedge
13th July 2010, 11:45
Hey Wedge I found the NGK's I removed. I ran them for about 10 miles when the bike was a 883 and about a mile as a 1200.
they are NGK DPR7EA
R 9

had a R under the NGK and a 9 under the DPR7EA

I'd just about send them to a NGK lover. if I knew they would keep them in their bike for remission of past sins, I might consider giving them away and sending them for free.

I had to even turn my idle up with these duds they were gaped at a loose .035

I didn't mention I have 200 psi cold cranking compression, that may have been a issue.
(but shouldn't have been a problem)

As a rule of thumb, as you up the compression you are also uping the temperature in the combustion chamber. This usually sends you looking for a colder plug so that it doesn't retain too much of that heat. Look at the porcelain for determining the heat range. If it is getting dark chocolate color or a hot black, then it's too hot a plug. You want to run a plug that will be light tan or white on the porcelain. If it starts getting an oily black then it's too cold a plug. (I am calling it an oily black, but I mean a cold black), no signs of blistering, etc and the electrode smooth and clean under the black. It's a bit difficult for someone new to it to determine the difference between a blistering hot black and a cold black, but once you get that it's easy.

wedge
13th July 2010, 11:50
Hey Wedge !

Shag over here and we can index and put in a set of Iridium 8'S

Then you can tell me what you think !
Yes, we need to do some joint testing. You could also come this way ya know. Straight down the 15 to the 60 West. Exit Vineyard go North to Philadelphia (the first street north of freeway) 1469 E. Philadelphia, big sign over entrance, can't miss it. That's between Vineyard and Grove on Philadelphia. More precisely it's between Baker and Parco.

rocketmangb
13th July 2010, 12:43
Sounds near my Ontario yard !

flathead45
13th July 2010, 13:41
plugs are plugs.

I have a set of splitfires that were in the bike when I bought it back in 2001, got the bike running in 2003 and never worry about them. I just don't understand how so many people can have so many problems with sparkplugs.


the only reason I have splits is they were there when I bought the bike.

LuxBlue
13th July 2010, 14:24
I am in the process of upgrading to a TC88A ignition with Turbota's Modified 35 Map. I will be upgrading to 8 mm Magnum Sterling Chromite spark plug wires

http://img1.jpcycles.com/zoom/380-902_A.jpg

and Denso Iridium Spark plugs.

http://www.nrhsperformance.com/images/iridiumsmall.jpg

wedge
13th July 2010, 15:27
Hey Wedge I found the NGK's I removed. I ran them for about 10 miles when the bike was a 883 and about a mile as a 1200.
they are NGK DPR7EA
R 9

had a R under the NGK and a 9 under the DPR7EA

I'd just about send them to a NGK lover. if I knew they would keep them in their bike for remission of past sins, I might consider giving them away and sending them for free.

I had to even turn my idle up with these duds they were gaped at a loose .035

I didn't mention I have 200 psi cold cranking compression, that may have been a issue.
(but shouldn't have been a problem)
Hmmm, there is no R 9 on my plugs. Also the same plug wrench fits the 6R12 plugs that fit the DCPR7E. Could that R 9 have anything to do with socket size? Still, it sounds like you had the wrong plugs. DPR7EA is not the same plug. The EA is familiar, that may be a dirt bike plug that I used to use. No, I just checked, that's not it... Ahhh, but here sits the last 4 plugs out of my Honda. They are D7EA 's. The resistor version of these may even be what you have. The reach and thread size is the same from what I see here, and the socket size would be the same too, so I have no idea why yours took a different wrench.

Oh, just put the plugs in and went for a long lunch (took a 30 mile loop). They run great, and it was obvious that the 6R12's were starting to go away, because this feels much better right now. I'll do some plug reading later. I forget what all the letters are supposed to mean except that the R is a resistor plug, and one of the other letters is the reach (I would guess that is either the D or the E since the Honda plug is the same reach as the Harley plug.) I'm going to go to NGK's site and see if I can get a chart.

wedge
13th July 2010, 15:33
plugs are plugs.

I have a set of splitfires that were in the bike when I bought it back in 2001, got the bike running in 2003 and never worry about them. I just don't understand how so many people can have so many problems with sparkplugs.


the only reason I have splits is they were there when I bought the bike.
I had a beaver dam when I lived in NH. Had to bust it out once in a while to reclaim my back yard, but they were quick to build it back though.

Anyway, so..... You spend all your time here and never ride that bike huh? That's about the only way you have the same plugs in it as back in 2001. Of course, with a side valve you have no compression, so I suppose you don't need a spark either. *Just yankin yer chain, I like flatheads too* I'm still pissed at a buddy who traded an 80 flathead for a 103 shovel. It's in the same bike and it's running now, but he gave up all that class for an average boat anchor.

tpjets62
13th July 2010, 16:15
Cool, check out my Honda in my gallery. I have had it since new in 78

I just picked up the NGK's last night and will put them in today. Yes, I have seen bad plugs before too. I can't remember a bad NGK right now, but at the track I sure saw a lot of Champions that were melted down. What's the ford plug? AC Delco? Anyway, the ford plugs were good too in the sportsman cars.

Ford / Autolite. AC Delco / GM

wedge
13th July 2010, 16:25
Ford / Autolite. AC Delco / GM
That leaves me confused a bit. I thought it was AC Delco that we liked back then, but could be Autolite from what you say here. Whatever, just avoid Champions. I won't put them in any vehicle after all the failures I have seen over the years.

tpjets62
13th July 2010, 17:53
That leaves me confused a bit. I thought it was AC Delco that we liked back then, but could be Autolite from what you say here. Whatever, just avoid Champions. I won't put them in any vehicle after all the failures I have seen over the years.

It probably was AC plugs. I had an 1980 XLS 1000 that would every so often fart and stall. After all the various attempts to get rid of failed, I put a set of AC plugs in and it never happened again. Made no sense but didnt care, it worked. I had tried a new set of Champions, no worse no better. One of my buddies who did alot of wrenchin on bikes said he only used AC or NGK, depending on the application...havent had any plug related problems since.