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Riding Tips & Safety Advice Got a question about your riding technique or safety issues?

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  #1  
Old 29th November 2004
conecuh
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Default Rear Tire blow out or fast leak at speed

I learned a valuable tip after a high speed blow-out on the rear tire. At first the bike started to wander around the road with steering corrections helping at first. As the tire lost almost all it's pressure, steering corrections did not help and at about 75 MPH the rear end started to rapidly swap from left to right as the air empty tire casing started to first roll to the right and then to the left of the rim. At this point I could not stay on the bike so I dismounted in the highway median and let the bike continue on.

Shortly, a sportster rider came to my rescue and I told him what happened. He said that if I had applied full rear brake, the casing would not have started swaping from side to side and steering control could have been maintained.

Tip: when the rear tire goes, apply full rear braking and steer to the side of the road.

I Haven't had to use this technique since, but the sportsrer rider said it worked for him. Any comments?

Make it go loud, conecuh
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  #2  
Old 29th November 2004
Darhawk Darhawk is offline
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I take the following from the MSF Basic RiderCourse.....


"........If a puncture should occur, maintain a firm hold on the handgrips, but do not fight the steering to correct any wobble or weave that can develop. Avoid downshifting and braking until speed is low and under control. If traffic permits, slow gradually and move off to the side of the road. If braking is necessary, use the brake on the good tire. Using the brake on the wheel with the bad tire can cause the tire to separate from the rim, and this can cause immediate loss of control. Be aware that integrated braking systems don't allow "rear brake only" application and linked braking systems do not allow any single brake operation............"

When you realized the rear tire was losing pressue, you should have layed off the throddle and began slowing with the front brake, pulling to the side of the road when slow and safe.
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Old 29th November 2004
Darhawk Darhawk is offline
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Conecuh,


Where are my manners, just noticed this was your first post to the forum...............
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Old 29th November 2004
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Jimbo999 Jimbo999 is offline
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Default To Brake or not to Brake

To Brake or not to Brake. We have two different opinions. Can we have more feedback on this one.??? ( I'm soooooo confused )
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Old 30th November 2004
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We'll look at it from an engineering standpoint..........


You have a tire going flat or already flat on a rim, doesn't matter front or rear. When you apply the brakes to the rim which has the flat tire, the rim stops turning. However, the rubber of the tire, because of friction between it and the road surface, continues to grab. Thus, the rubber tire, because of friction and its no longer being allowed to turn with the rim, will be ripped from the rim, leading to loss of control of the bike. The bike is now cutting into the road with the rim. Serious injury or death can result.

My experience, as well as the information presented in the MSF course, both bring me to understand that braking should occur to the good tire. Just as with a car, lay off the gas, slow the vehicle, pull to the side of the road when safe and far enough to be safe, turn on your flashers, and seek aid.
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Old 30th November 2004
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I will save you the story of a near death experience ,only saying thank you again to an unknown trucker for running interference for me in heavy traffic.
If you do as instructed in the MSF course instructions,I feel you will have a better chance of survival,or at least I stayed upright.
If the flat tire breaks bead there you loose all controle.
It is hard sometime for common sense to override the effects of the pucker factor,but if you can manage that,you find that instinct kicks in.
I always tell my wife : Hang on,this could be bad.
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Old 30th November 2004
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Quote:
Originally Posted by conecuh
at about 75 MPH the rear end started to rapidly swap from left to right ...... At this point I could not stay on the bike so I dismounted in the highway median and let the bike continue on.
I know you're new so I won't rag on ya but.... you are one lucky dude.
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Old 30th November 2004
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IMHO I would think that applying full brake to the rear at 75 MPH would not be a very good idea with or without a flat tire.

In this situation I believe I would try to go with the MSF advice and try to coast to a lower speed before applying any brake to the flat tire as long as there was no obstacle in front of me.
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  #9  
Old 30th November 2004
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Conecuh,
I'm glad you survived your experience and brought this topic up.

I had a similar experience a couple of years ago. I ran over a piece of road debris that a cage had kicked into my lane. I had an immediate deflation of the rear tire at around 80 mph in the fast lane in full rush hour traffic. I had just cleared a toll plaza and there was no left shoulder available, so while coasting and trying to keep the bike under control I had to get across 3 lanes of traffic to get to the very narrow right shoulder. Unfortunately I wasn't able to get over in time to make the last exit from the toll road and had to park the bike as close as possible to the wall on the shoulder and wait for help to arrive. Traffic speeding by at 70-80 mph almost blew the bike into the wall while it was on the sidestand & several vehicles that weren't paying attention almost clipped it as they passed. All I could do was hop over the wall and watch nervously. I called a friend with a trailer to come rescue me but had to wait over an hour in the lovely Texas summer heat (no shade) for him to get across town. I called the toll road authority to report the bike being just out of traffic's way and after about 30 minutes a Sheriff's department car came along and blocked the lane and waited with me until the trailer arrived (he got out of his car and waited over the wall too). The Deputy put his car across two lanes when the trailer arrived so we could get the bike loaded and be on our way.

Things I've learned from this:

1. Leave the brakes alone in a flat tire situation. It's probably one of the scariest things to have happen, but hitting the brake will compound your problem. Braking could cause the tire bead to come off the wheel and it could get tangled up with the swingarm or fender and lock the wheel up - your control is gone at that point. 20 years ago I had a chain break and do just that at 50-60mph (have the scars to prove it). The side-to-side swapping of a flat tire is unpredictable enough even at low speeds, braking could make it worse.
2. If your vehicle becomes disabled on a highway - get away from it!
3. Law officers are your best friend when your vehicle is stranded near the road. Call them and let them know you're there.
4. Carry a cell phone - I hate them probably as much as anybody, but in a situation like that they can be your savior.
5. Carry a phone list of several towing services in your area...don't rely on HOG or AMA, they're good organizations but not always the fastest to respond. If you have friends with trucks or trailers, keep their numbers handy. I've hauled a lot of friends bikes over the years and you never know when you may need to call in a favor.
6. I carry a set of cycle tie-downs in my saddlebags and in my truck for emergency use. If you drive a pick-up truck you should stop if you see a disabled bike on the road, I have picked up several bikes for strangers over the years and made some good friends in the process. "What goes around, comes around"

I'm sorry of this got a bit long-winded...
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  #10  
Old 30th November 2004
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1. Stay off the brake!
2. Stay on the bike!
3. Focus on steering until safely stopped!
4. Have tire repaired!
5. Drink beer!
6. Drink more beer!
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